Taliesin West Inscribed on UNESCO World Heritage List

Joins seven other Wright sites

With 11 of his buildings in the Greater Phoenix area alone, most Valley residents are familiar with the work of Frank Lloyd Wright. Wright’s visionary work cemented his place as the American Institute of Architects’ “greatest American architect of all time.” And in July, the World Heritage Committee, meeting in Baku, Azerbaijan, officially inscribed The 20th-Century Architecture of Frank Lloyd Wright, which includes eight major works spanning 50 years of Wright’s career, on the UNESCO World Heritage List (whc.unesco.org).
The sites include Unity Temple (Oak Park, Illinois), the Frederick C. Robie House (Chicago, Illinois), Taliesin (Spring Green, Wisconsin), Hollyhock House (Los Angeles, California), Fallingwater (Mill Run, Pennsylvania), the Herbert and Katherine Jacobs House (Madison, Wisconsin), Taliesin West (Scottsdale) and the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum (New York, New York).
There are more than 1,000 World Heritage sites around the world, and the group of Wright sites is now among only 24 sites in the U.S. The collection represents the first modern architecture designation in the country on the prestigious list.
“This recognition by UNESCO is a significant way for us to reconfirm how important Frank Lloyd Wright was to the development of modern architecture around the world,” says Barbara Gordon, executive director of the Frank Lloyd Wright Building Conservancy. “There are nearly 400 remaining structures designed by Wright. Our hope is that the inscription of these eight major works also brings awareness to the importance of preserving all of his buildings as a vital part of our artistic, cultural and architectural heritage. All communities where a Wright building stands should appreciate what they have and share in the responsibility to protect their local — and world — heritage.”
Here in Arizona, Taliesin West, also a National Historic Landmark, is nestled in the desert foothills of the McDowell Mountains. It serves as the home of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation and the School of Architecture at Taliesin. Wright’s beloved winter home, and the bustling headquarters of the Taliesin Fellowship, was established in 1937 and handcrafted over many years. Deeply connected to the desert from which it was forged, Taliesin West was built and maintained almost entirely by Wright and his apprentices, making it among the most personal of the architect’s creations.

“These sites are not simply World Heritage monuments because they are beautiful,” said Stuart Graff, president and CEO of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation. “It’s so much more than that. These are places of profound influence, inspiration and connection.”

To learn more about the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation or to tour Taliesin West, visit www.franklloydwright.org.

 

Scottsdale Library Launches Wright Design Exhibit

2017 Taliesin West, front evening; Photo: Andrew Pielage

Opening reception slated for Sept. 21

© 2018 Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation, Scottdale, AZ. Courtesy of The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives (The Museum of Modern Art | Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University, New York). All rights reserved.

Valley residents are invited to learn more about the legendary Frank Lloyd Wright’s impact on Arizona architecture through Footprints on the Desert: Frank Lloyd Wright in Arizona from Sept. 15 – Dec. 31 at the Gallery @ the Library, Scottsdale Civic Center, 3839 North Drinkwater Boulevard.

“Frank Lloyd Wright believed the United States needed an architecture of its own, but also believed that the dramatically different geographic areas of the country called for designs that were appropriate to their character,” said Margo Stipe, director and curator of collections for the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation. “He was enchanted by Arizona and said it ‘seems to cry out for a space-loving architecture of its own.’”

The American Institute of Architects has called Wright the “greatest American architect of all time.” Celebrate his work with this exhibition, which features images and artifacts connected to notable Wright-designed buildings in the Grand Canyon State, including Taliesin West in Scottsdale, the David & Gladys Wright House in Phoenix and the Harold Price Sr. House in Paradise Valley.

Footprints on the Desert offers a brief introduction to Wright’s ideas about how to build in the Southwest,” Stipe said. “Centered around Taliesin West, the architect’s iconic winter home here, the exhibit features designs, built and unbuilt, of what both public and private spaces could be when designed with an appreciation for the brutal power and incredible beauty of the desert. The takeaway, we hope, will be inspiration and the understanding that our living spaces matter — and that so much more is possible than most of what is being built today.”

An opening reception will be held Friday, Sept. 21, from 6:30–8pm. The keynote speaker will be Scottsdale architect Vernon Swaback, a Wright apprentice and former director of planning for the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation. In addition to the reception four free workshops will be offered at the library throughout the exhibitions run, the first of which is scheduled for October 8.

This project was made possible, in part, by the Institute of Museum and Library Services in cooperation with Scottsdale Public Art, the City of Scottsdale, the Arizona Heritage Center and the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation.

For information about the exhibition, visit www.scottsdalepublicart.org and click on the “Temporary Art/Exhibitions” link or call 480.874.4645.

Frank Lloyd Wright Exhibition Opens At Phoenix Art Museum

 “A building is not just a place to be. It is a way to be.” – Frank Lloyd Wright

FLW at Taliesin West – Frank Lloyd Wright at Taliesin West, 1955. Courtesy Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation, Scottsdale, Arizona

Frank Lloyd Wright was a champion of organic architecture. His visionary designs emphasized the use of natural materials, harmonious integration of building and landscape and high functionality. Many concepts developed in Wright’s revolutionary work are central to today’s sustainable, green architecture movement.

Frank Lloyd Wright: Organic Architecture for the 21st Century explores the tenets of Wright’s organic architecture – appropriateness to time, place and people – through the current perspective of green building; specifically, the concepts of energy, materials, site, climate, space efficiency, pre-fabricated technology, transportation and urban planning. It is the first exhibition to explore Wright and his relevance today through a survey of more than 40 projects, including his vision for the decentralized city, presented through rarely seen drawings, scale models, furniture, films and photographs.

Frank Lloyd Wright: Organic Architecture for the 21st Century is organized by Phoenix Art Museum and Milwaukee Art Museum in conjunction with the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation and opens at PhoenixArt Museum on December 18. The exhibition closes on April 29.

For more information, call 602.257.1222 or visit www.phxart.org.

Fallingwater FLW – Frank Lloyd Wright, Edgar J. Kaufmann House, “Fallingwater,” Mill Run, Pennsylvania, 1934-37 © 1936 Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation, Scottsdale, Arizona
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