Frank Lloyd Wright Building Conservancy Announces New ‘Wright Virtual Visits’

Hollyhock House; Photo: Stan Ecklund

Unity Temple sanctuary; Photo: James Caulfield

The Frank Lloyd Wright Building Conservancy, in partnership with the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation and Unity Temple Restoration Foundation, announced Monday the next evolution of its popular social media video series, Wright Virtual Visits, which highlights Frank Lloyd Wright-designed public sites from around the country, many of which are currently closed due to COVID-19.

What’s new this time around? Every Thursday starting Aug. 20 at 1pm EST/ 10am PST., two Frank Lloyd Wright sites will be paired up to go live — side by side — on Facebook Live video. The sites will focus on a particular theme, comparing and contrasting how that theme is expressed in Wright’s design at each. There will be Q&A with questions taken via Facebook. Twenty other Wright sites will promote the live event each week by sharing their own photos or short videos responding to the theme, engaging the broader Wright community in a unique dialogue. The archive of videos, schedule of upcoming events, and list of sites participating in the project will be maintained and updated at savewright.org/wrightvirtualvisits.

In response to the shutdowns caused by the pandemic, Wright Virtual Visits continues a campaign that began in April 2020 when more than 20 Wright sites from across the country participated in swapping weekly pre-recorded videos. The first phase is archived here. This 2.0 version is the result of audience feedback requesting a more interactive and in-depth experience.

“Frank Lloyd Wright’s work was all about connection: connection between people and nature, buildings and nature, and people and each other,” said Jeff Goodman, vice president of communication and partnerships for the Foundation. “When the pandemic shut down our normal way of life, many of us mourned the loss of those connections. We started Wright Virtual Visits with the intention to bring Wright sites together, and connect with people from all over the world to share in the inspiration we can all take from Wright’s work. We hope these virtual visits will not only bring a little beauty and joy to people’s lives, but also inspire them to think differently about how to live more deeply connected to nature, art, and each other,”

Upcoming visits (more to be announced soon):

  • Thursday, Aug. 20: Taliesin West (Scottsdale, AZ) & Unity Temple (Oak Park, IL). Theme: Wright’s use of natural light
  • Thursday, Aug. 27: Monona Terrace (Madison, WI) & Hollyhock House (Los Angeles, CA). Theme to be announced.
  • Thursday, Sept. 3: Gordon House (Silverton, OR) & Burnham Block (Milwaukee, WI). Theme to be announced.

For more information on the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation, visit franklloydwright.org.

Taliesin West Inscribed on UNESCO World Heritage List

Joins seven other Wright sites

With 11 of his buildings in the Greater Phoenix area alone, most Valley residents are familiar with the work of Frank Lloyd Wright. Wright’s visionary work cemented his place as the American Institute of Architects’ “greatest American architect of all time.” And in July, the World Heritage Committee, meeting in Baku, Azerbaijan, officially inscribed The 20th-Century Architecture of Frank Lloyd Wright, which includes eight major works spanning 50 years of Wright’s career, on the UNESCO World Heritage List (whc.unesco.org).
The sites include Unity Temple (Oak Park, Illinois), the Frederick C. Robie House (Chicago, Illinois), Taliesin (Spring Green, Wisconsin), Hollyhock House (Los Angeles, California), Fallingwater (Mill Run, Pennsylvania), the Herbert and Katherine Jacobs House (Madison, Wisconsin), Taliesin West (Scottsdale) and the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum (New York, New York).
There are more than 1,000 World Heritage sites around the world, and the group of Wright sites is now among only 24 sites in the U.S. The collection represents the first modern architecture designation in the country on the prestigious list.
“This recognition by UNESCO is a significant way for us to reconfirm how important Frank Lloyd Wright was to the development of modern architecture around the world,” says Barbara Gordon, executive director of the Frank Lloyd Wright Building Conservancy. “There are nearly 400 remaining structures designed by Wright. Our hope is that the inscription of these eight major works also brings awareness to the importance of preserving all of his buildings as a vital part of our artistic, cultural and architectural heritage. All communities where a Wright building stands should appreciate what they have and share in the responsibility to protect their local — and world — heritage.”
Here in Arizona, Taliesin West, also a National Historic Landmark, is nestled in the desert foothills of the McDowell Mountains. It serves as the home of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation and the School of Architecture at Taliesin. Wright’s beloved winter home, and the bustling headquarters of the Taliesin Fellowship, was established in 1937 and handcrafted over many years. Deeply connected to the desert from which it was forged, Taliesin West was built and maintained almost entirely by Wright and his apprentices, making it among the most personal of the architect’s creations.

“These sites are not simply World Heritage monuments because they are beautiful,” said Stuart Graff, president and CEO of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation. “It’s so much more than that. These are places of profound influence, inspiration and connection.”

To learn more about the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation or to tour Taliesin West, visit www.franklloydwright.org.

 

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