Providing the Essentials for Arizona’s Foster Children

Many hands make it work

Today, in the state of Arizona, there are 14,000 children in foster care. When a family is in crisis, and the Department of Child Safety steps in, it is often another family member who is called upon to temporarily care for children. But all too frequently, that family member may not be able to provide for some basic needs at a moment’s notice, which is where Arizona Helping Hands steps in.

“Arizona Helping Hands is the largest provider of essential needs to children in our foster care system, though our core program is providing children with a safe place to sleep,” says Dan Shufelt, president and CEO.

Shufelt says that in 2013, at what he describes as the height of the foster care crisis, the organization learned that many families in urgent foster situations had no one to turn to for essentials, so, they shifted their mission.

“We stepped in back in 2013 and started providing foster families in that type of situation with twin beds and cribs to give those children a safe place to sleep. And that was our toe in the door of helping children in foster care throughout the state of Arizona. And we haven’t looked back.”

In 2019, the organization provided 2,582 children with twin beds. Cribs were provided for 978 infants, many of whom Shufelt says were released into foster care from neo-natal intensive care units after overcoming substance abuse.

A volunteer sorts items in the organization’s 18,000-square-foot warehouse

In addition to beds, Arizona Helping Hands provides clothing, diapers and personal care items, as well as back-to-school items and even safety items to encourage other families to step up and become foster homes.

The organization also wants to make sure that children know that they are loved, which is why it launched a Birthday Package program.

“We want these kids to have a sense of self-esteem and want them to feel loved and supported and we want them to celebrate their birthday,” says Shufelt. “I’ve had many children in foster care who have never celebrated a birthday, and it’s not right. We have to do better than that.”

A representative for any child in Arizona’s foster care system can apply online for a birthday gift package. Pre-COVID-19, volunteers would head into the office every day and, taking the submitted applications, they “shop” throughout the organization’s 18,000-square-foot warehouse. Whether it is a Barbie doll or craft set, games, books or stuffed animals, volunteers find the perfect items for each individual child. The gifts are then wrapped and placed in bags with special messaging, “to let those kids know that they are not forgotten; that they are loved.”

“In 2019, we provided 3,596 children with a birthday package. Ten children every day of last year received a birthday package because of the work that we are doing at Arizona Helping Hands.”

A volunteer wraps birthday presents for Arizona foster children.

Volunteers are instrumental in the birthday program but also assist in other ways. Last year, 1,400 volunteers donated 13,000 hours of service. Of course, the coronavirus changed everything. After closures in March, volunteers began coming back in early June. The organization hopes to increase the number of participants this month and possibly reopen its doors the first week in August. Residents who are interested in volunteering can complete an application at azhelpinghands.org.

Another way that residents can support foster children is to donate to the organization’s Back-to-School Drive. Any donor can go online at ahhbacktoschool.org and make a $35 contribution, which will buy a backpack stuffed full of educational tools to help kids start the school year prepared for success.

“We rely on the generosity of our community in everything that we do, and everybody has the opportunity to utilize their time, talents and treasure to help others in our community,” says Shufelt. “And that’s what we rely on, generous people who have chosen to support an organization like ours that truly makes a difference for children who have been abused and neglected.” |CST


Photos courtesy of Arizona Helping Hands

Three Thousand and Counting — Area Students Unite to Donate Masks During Pandemic

In the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, local students are leading the charge in the battle to slow the spread of the coronavirus and making a big difference in the community.

Established in March by Cactus Shadows High School junior Angelique Cort, the AZ Mask Project focuses on harnessing the energy of a corps of volunteers to mass produce masks and provide them at no charge to critical care workers and compromised populations in the Phoenix area.

“In March, my mom [Corinne Cort] and I started sewing masks on a small scale,” said Cort. “Soon afterward we were contacted by HonorHealth whose needs were much greater. Arizona State Senator Paul Boyer learned of our efforts and expressed a need for thousands of masks. This was clearly beyond our capability at the time, so I started looking into ways to scale up the operation dramatically.”

Her search for volunteers and donors led to a partnership with Cave Creek Unified School District Superintendent Dr. Debbi Burdick, who put the word out across the district.

“Over 70 volunteers answered the call, and the AZ Mask Project was born.”

The homemade, reusable cloth masks are delivered to front-line healthcare workers, emergency responders and community organizations throughout Greater Phoenix, including Banner Health, Cave Creek Unified School District, HonorHealth, Infinity Hospice Care, Mayo Clinic and Phoenix Children’s Hospital, among others.

Cort says that the Project has special meaning to her because her life goal is to become an emergency-room surgeon. She also says that they couldn’t have accomplished this feat without the Project’s dozens of volunteers.

“The heart and soul of our Project are our generous, community-spirited volunteers,” said Cort. “Spanning the range from students to retirees and drawing from every demographic, resilient and relentless, these selfless individuals daily contribute their time, their energy, and their goodwill to make our community a better, safer, healthier place.

“Regardless of whether they cut fabric, sew masks, make pickups and deliveries, maintain our Facebook page, donate materials, or perform any of a host of other services, they quietly make a difference every day.”

Each week, Cort creates and oversees a staged fabrication process that moves materials through multiple phases of production. She coordinates volunteers, works with donors and interfaces with beneficiary organizations. Jeffrey Filer, another Cactus Shadows junior and patrol leader in Boy Scout Troop 15, proposed and implemented a robust system that enlists three Boy Scout troops (Troops 15, 323 and 3323) to fulfill the logistical needs of the project.

Every week, Patrol Leader Filer’s Scouts deliver materials to volunteers across the Valley, move partially completed masks from cutters to the next production location, pick up finished masks and deliver finished masks to beneficiary organizations throughout the Phoenix area. Together, Cort and Filer have sustained an effort that donates hundreds of masks each week, most recently surpassing the 3,000-mask milestone.

And they are not done yet. AZ Mask Project says that it remains committed to maintaining and expanding its efforts as the need exists, and Cort says that the group is continually in search of new volunteers.

“Everyone is welcome into our Fellowship of the Mask. For those who don’t sew, we welcome your help cutting fabric. We will provide the material and support you need to get started. We provide certificates of community service hours for our student volunteers. If you are already involved in making and donating masks, we are eager to partner with you.”
Residents interested in getting involved may contact Cort by email: chancecort@me.com. The Project also has a Facebook group: search “AZ Mask Project.” |CST


Photos courtesy of AZ Mask Project

The Tables Are Set! — Arizona Restaurant Weeks: Dine in or Take Out

It has been a rough couple of months for the food and beverage industry. In Arizona, COVID-19 brought about closures in mid-March that threatened the industry to its core. Restaurant owners had to quickly adapt their business models to offer take-out, curbside and delivery options, and some even offered cocktails to go. Some restaurants became community grocery stores, while others served their community by preparing meals for front-line workers and those in need.

The local community stepped up, too, and helped support the restaurants that make up the Valley’s dynamic culinary scene. In addition to ordering pick-up and delivery, residents responded by patronizing special pop-up events, and donating to virtual tip jars in support of workers.

The closure mandates also meant that the annual Arizona Restaurant Week (ARW) event was placed on hold; however, Arizona Takeout Weeks was created to encourage continued dining support. In the midst of all of the upheaval, the Arizona Restaurant Association (ARA) created Arizona Restaurant Strong (www.azrestaurantstrong.com), a relief fund to provide support for restaurant workers who found themselves suddenly out of work.

Roaring Fork

The House Brasserie

Now that closure mandates have expired and regulations begin to lift, the ARA has announced that Arizona Restaurant Weeks: Dine in or Take Out will take place Friday, June 19, through Sunday, June 28, and Friday, Sept. 18, through Sunday, Sept. 27.

In a statement, ARA president and CEO Steve Chucri said, “We are so grateful for the support of our local dining community in the weeks that followed restaurant closures in March. The quick creation of Arizona Takeout Weeks and Arizona Restaurant Strong efforts could not have been possible without them. As Arizona Restaurant Weeks returns in a modified format to include dine-in, take out and liquor to-go options, we are hopeful that our wonderful community of food enthusiasts will continue to show their support in any way they feel comfortable.”

During the new Arizona Restaurant Weeks: Dine in or Take Out, ARA says that participating restaurants will follow all CDC guidelines for opening and social distancing, whether dining in or taking out. The organization is anticipating more than 200 of the Valley’s restaurants — “from five-star fine dining establishments to locally owned and operated ‘mom and pop’ hidden gems” — to get involved.

Participating restaurants around the state will offer diners a dedicated menu that showcases the chefs’ talents. Featuring a unique tasting opportunity apart from their regular menus, restaurants will offer three-course, prix-fixe menus for $33 or $44 per person. Wine pairings to enhance each course are offered at some establishments for an additional cost.

Several new restaurants joining the June ARW line-up this year include The Dressing Room, The House Brasserie, Josephine, Meritage Urban Tavern, Sel, Stonegrill and Tuck Shop Kitchen and Bar. Of course, many of diners’ favorites are returning to the event again this year. A complete list of participating restaurants can be found on the event website: www.arizonarestaurantweek.com.

Harold’s Corral Donates Nearly 4,000 Meals During Pandemic

—By Sue Kern-Fleischer

Franny Pachuca makes brisket at Harold’s for meals that will be donated to the Foothills Food Bank and Cave Creek Unified School District.

It’s been just a few weeks since Arizona reopened, lifting the “Stay at Home” restrictions put in place to help flatten the curve from COVID-19. And while Harold’s Cave Creek Corral’s dining room is open to patrons, the iconic restaurant is continuing a unique take-out program it started with the help of the Kiwanis Club of Carefree more than two months ago to help feed families in need.

In its nearly 85 years of business, Harold’s had never experienced operating during a global pandemic. But when it became clear that the highly contagious coronavirus (COVID-19) could endanger the lives of customers and staff, Harold’s shifted into crisis mode, with the goal of helping the community the popular restaurant serves.

Like restaurants across the country, Harold’s temporarily closed its dining room and began to offer curbside and take-out service. But the popular western bar and restaurant took matters a step further, soliciting the help of the Kiwanis Club of Carefree to help fund a unique program to help the Foothills Food Bank and families of the Cave Creek Unified School District (CCUSD).

Harold’s designed its take-out menu to include a unique commitment to the community: For every family-style meal ordered, which feeds four to five people, Harold’s will donate a family-style meal to a family in need through the District’s meal assistance program. Additionally, Harold’s is donating individual meals to the Foothills Food Bank.

Both Harold’s Corral and the Kiwanis Club of Carefree provided funding to start the program. Harold’s prepares the meals and the District and the Foothills Food Bank pick up the meals and distribute them.

Margaret Carver and Danny Piacquadio package meals for the Foothills Food Bank and Cave Creek Unified School District.

From March to May, Harold’s donated more than 3,500 meals, and the unique program will continue this month.

“If you would like to help with this program, you can make direct donations to the Kiwanis Club of Carefree or the Foothills Food Bank and note the donation is for Harold’s meal assistance program. Our goal is to continue to support both the food bank and CCUSD through this time of crisis. Thanks to Kiwanis Club of Carefree, Harold’s Corral and our customers, plus Shamrock Foods, we are able to provide these meals to those in need,” owner Danny Piacquadio said.

Take-out service through Harold’s is available seven days per week, with orders taken from 8am to 2:30pm. Since reopening its dining room in mid-May, Harold’s has been following CDC guidelines regarding sanitization efforts and social distancing. The dining room and outdoor patio is open for breakfast, lunch and dinner Monday through Thursday from 8am to 10pm and Friday, Saturday and Sunday from 8am to midnight.

Harold’s Cave Creek Corral is located at 6895 E. Cave Creek Rd. For more information, call 480.488.1906 or visit www.haroldscorral.com.

To learn more about Cave Creek Unified School District, visit www.ccusd93.org. To learn more about the Foothills Food Bank, visit www.foothillsfoodbank.com. For details about the Kiwanis Club of Carefree, visit www.kiwaniscarefree.org.

Supporting Small Businesses in a Crisis

Chamber steps up to reassure community

By Kathryn M. Miller ~ National Small Business Week has been postponed. The U.S. Small Business Administration event, originally scheduled for May 3–9, is an annual celebration of entrepreneurship and innovation. Never has there been a greater time for innovation in the small business community, nor a better time for recognition at all levels of our local small businesses.

There are more than 550,000 small businesses, (those with fewer than 500 employees) in Arizona, and it is estimated that these businesses employ one million workers, representing 44.5 percent of the state’s private workforce.

Studies show that when residents buy local, it makes a difference. But what happens when a crisis hits — and businesses are closed, or scramble to change their business model in an effort to meet demands or just stay afloat? At press time, Arizona is still under the Governor’s “Stay Home, Stay Healthy, Stay Connected” Executive Order, which is set to expire April 30. Whether or not safety restrictions are lifted in May, the small business landscape has been forever altered, and the community is looking for help.

Representing nearly 400 businesses in the Carefree, Cave Creek, Phoenix and Scottsdale area, the Carefree Cave Creek Chamber of Commerce is just one organization that is stepping up to provide resources for businesses that are experiencing the challenging impacts of COVID-19.

Patty Villeneuve, president and CEO of the Chamber, says that the main challenge that they are helping members overcome is the fear of the unknown.

“Once we truly understand we are all in this together we can breathe a small sigh of relief and buckle in to communicate what unique need one business has versus another.”

To help communicate with the community, the Chamber has created a comprehensive resource page that is easily found on the front page of its website (www.carefreecavecreek.org).

“This information has been gathered from local Congressional delegates, Governor Ducey’s office, the Small Business Association, Small Business Development Center and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce,” said Villeneuve. “The information includes where and how to access needed funding for our business community and resources for the employees of our business community.

“As a part of the resource page we also have a comprehensive list of businesses that are open for curbside, the phone number and a link to their website. We are listing all businesses, not just Chamber members. Even though we are a membership-based organization it is important that we offer as much help as we can to our entire community. We are truly, all in this together. We have also invited the community to share in webinars and conference calls so that they have an opportunity to hear directly from the people mentioned before.”

Villeneuve says that additional relief funds have become available for EIDL (Economic Injury Disaster Loan) and PPP (Paycheck Protection Program) loans for the business community, and that the Arizona Chamber Executives, which she is currently board chair of, approached the Governor for one-time funds to be included in the state budget to be delivered directly to Chambers across the state for things like low-cost and no-cost grants.

“I can assure you that every Chamber Executive within the state are lobbying every single day to state and federal officials for increased funding.”

Beyond the support that the Chamber is providing to community businesses, Villeneuve says that the community as a whole can help support the local businesses that it relies upon.

“Continue supporting the businesses that are open for curbside pickup, buying gift cards from all businesses (not just restaurants) that can be used later. When more businesses can re-open, the ones that rely on tips, consider tipping a little more than usual. This will mean a lot to these workers. Continue to support the food bank with donations of food, money or volunteer hours. They need your support now more than ever. Don’t forget our other nonprofits with donations of time and money. Their donor bases are significantly impacted also.

“Finally, be kind to one another. We are all in this together. Kindness will go a long way with reassuring people that everything will be OK.” |CST

Weathering the Storm: Collaboration & Innovation Key to Small Business Recovery

By Kathryn M. Miller ~ National Small Business Week has been postponed. The U.S. Small Business Administration event, originally scheduled for May 3–9, is an annual celebration of entrepreneurship and innovation. Never has there been a greater time for innovation in the small business community, nor a better time for recognition at all levels of our local small businesses.

There are more than 550,000 small businesses, (those with fewer than 500 employees) in Arizona, and it is estimated that these businesses employ one million workers, representing 44.5 percent of the state’s private workforce.

Studies show that when residents buy local, it makes a difference. But what happens when a crisis hits — and businesses are closed, or scramble to change their business model in an effort to meet demands or just stay afloat? At press time, Arizona is still under the Governor’s “Stay Home, Stay Healthy, Stay Connected” Executive Order, which is set to expire April 30. Whether or not safety restrictions are lifted in May, the small business landscape has been forever altered, and the community is looking for help.

Representing more than 3,000 businesses across the state, Local First Arizona (LFA) is just one organization that is stepping up to provide resources for businesses that are experiencing the challenging impacts of COVID-19.

“As you could imagine, most businesses, if not all, have been impacted in a major way from the COVID-19 crisis, so we have stepped in to provide direct consulting to any business that needs support at this time,” said executive director Thomas Barr.

“All businesses are different and dealing with different things and so we’ve taken a personalized approach to consulting with them. This could be helping them apply for loans through the federal government, making them aware of other grants or loans that are available in their cities or towns, and connecting them to professionals that can help them with deeper questions in legal services, accounting, HR, or even PR and marketing, even business coaching.”

Although the services are offered to members of the organization, they have opened up the membership program for any business that is unable to afford to join.

“We launched a sponsor a business program open to people in the community about a month ago and have had over 300 businesses sponsored to become a part of Local First and get access to these resources at no cost.”

The organization is also active in providing current information and resources to the community in general through its COVID-19 webpage. (www.localfirstaz.com/covid19)

“This is something that is just available to the community and will continue to be a resource, and anybody can access it. This includes up-to-date information from the Small Business Administration, information about jobs that are available for people looking, through our partners at Pipeline AZ (www.pipelineaz.com), and a wide variety of information and resources that we’ve collected to be able to communicate to the community.”

LFA is also collaborating with industry-specific organizations such as the Arizona Small Restaurant Coalition (www.arizonasrc.com) and National Independent Venue Association (www.nivassoc.org) to help spread awareness of available resources.

“We are collaborating at every opportunity possible,” said Barr. “We are getting on board with, linking arms with them, and spreading the word.”

Another resource that the LFA team quickly put together is a Support Local website, a portal where community members can find businesses that are open and offering gift cards, delivery and curbside pick-up, and more. (www.supportlocal.xyz)

“Small businesses have always shown up for us, and it’s now our time. If you have the means, you really need to show up for them so that they reopen once we go to rebuild the economy. We can’t take them for granted. At every opportunity, we need to support them and involve them so that we don’t see more businesses close permanently.” |CST

It’s Time to Rally for Area Nonprofits

By Kathryn M. Miller ~

Neighbors heading out on an excursion with Foothills Caring Corps, before a time of “social distancing.”

As April begins, the world finds itself living in unprecedented times. In Arizona, schools have been temporarily closed, many businesses are closed or working at half-capacity, events have been postponed or canceled and Valley organizations and institutions — those that serve the most vulnerable among us and those that bring us hope, light and beauty — are struggling to adapt and meet the needs of those they serve.

Some food banks and other social services are feeling extra pressure as Arizona’s unemployment numbers climb amid the spread of the coronavirus. In addition, nonprofits have been negatively impacted by closures and restrictions — with major fundraising events canceled and difficulty obtaining the commodities that they need.

Foothills Caring Crops (www.foothillscaringcorps.com; 480.488.1105) is one nonprofit that has been impacted. The organization’s Taste of Foothills fundraising event, scheduled for March 26, was canceled amidst COVID-19 concerns.

“This cancellation is for one of the most important sources of revenue we use to operate Foothills Caring Corps,” said Debbra Determan, executive director. “The ‘ASK’ and live auction portions of the evening have played a big role in providing us with the resources to fully maintain our operations.”

“We hope that there will be some among you who may want to step up and help us reduce our loss. You have been so supportive in the last 15 years of our Taste of Foothills fund-raisers” [Read more about Foothills Caring Corps on page 18.]

Volunteers help fill bags at Foothills Food Bank.

 

Foothills Food Bank and Resource Center (www.foothillsfoodbank.com; 480.488.1145) is also feeling the impact, but in a different way. Although the food bank has seen a slight increase in area residents in need of their services, finding the items that their clients need has been a challenge.

“We have seen an increase, but not that many, yet,” said Foothills Food Bank executive director Pam DiPietro. “We feel if this virus continues to prevent us from moving back to normalcy, the numbers will grow. We are committed to helping those that live and work in the area we serve.”

“At this point in time, the things we need most are the same items that everyone is looking for: paper towels, toilet paper, disinfectant products, wipes, bleach.”

DiPietro says that while the food bank is always in need of non-perishable food, the items currently most needed are soups of all kinds, tuna, pasta sauce and juice.

The food bank has a dedicated team of volunteers that, even during challenging times, keep up with the community’s needs.

“The majority of our volunteers are seniors; however, every day we manage to have enough people to get the job done. Our volunteers, all 400, are wonderful and we truly appreciate them.”

“We hope to be able to continue to serve those in need, while cautiously maintaining safety. We do not come in contact with the client. They call us, we package the food, set it on a table at our door and the Client drives up and picks up the food.”

But DiPietro reiterates that, right now, the most import way that the community can help: “Find us critical the things that we need!” |CST

A Time to Rally for Valley Nonprofits

Arizona Gives Day 2020

By Kathryn M. Miller ~ Arizona Gives Day is an annual, online giving movement aimed at celebrating and increasing philanthropy in Arizona through a 24-hour online giving event,

A collaboration between the Alliance of Arizona Nonprofits and the Arizona Grantmakers Forum, with FirstBank as the presenting sponsor, the event helps raise awareness about the critical role Arizona nonprofits play in communities and inspires people to give generously creating a thriving and stronger Arizona for all. This year’s event is scheduled for April 7, and the need for support has never been greater.

As April begins, the world finds itself living in unprecedented times. In Arizona, schools are on hiatus, many businesses are temporarily closed or working at half-capacity, events have been postponed or canceled and Valley organizations and institutions — those that serve the most vulnerable among us and those that bring us hope, light and beauty — are struggling to adapt and meet the needs of those they serve.

At the same time that some Valley nonprofits are forced to cancel their spring fundraisers they are also seeing an increase in needs. Shoebox Ministry in North Phoenix is one such organization. The nonprofit coordinates the collection and distribution of toiletry items for people in the Phoenix Metro area who are experiencing homelessness and others who need but cannot afford hygiene items. [Read “Serving the Valley’s Most Vulnerable” on page 10.]

“We have postponed our first-ever fundraising breakfast that was scheduled for Friday, April 3,” says Jarrett Ransom, executive director. “At that event, we planned to showcase the Shoebox history, the hard work we are currently doing to serve the hygiene needs in our community and share our plans for the future. Our fundraising goal for the event was to raise $50,000 and since we no longer have that opportunity and we’re experiencing a surge in the demand for our services, we’re in need of support more than ever. As we move our fundraising to only an online platform, we are working to create ways to engage through video and continue to raise the funds we so desperately need.”

“One of our biggest challenges at the moment is the need to order hygiene items in bulk (and the funds to do so). Bulk products enable us to limit contact with in-kind donors and increases our efficiencies when we lack a volunteer base to help us count and sort items and pack kits.”

Shoebox Ministry is not alone. Many food banks and other social services are feeling extra pressure as Arizona’s unemployment numbers climb amid the spread of the coronavirus. In addition, many of the nonprofit arts institutions have been negatively impacted by closures — with major events canceled and theaters, museums and libraries closed.

The Alliance kicked off early giving March 17, in an effort to address some of the more immediate needs. In addition, a group of donors has provided separate funding to waive payment processing fees normally paid by nonprofits participating in the Arizona Gives Day.

“What this means is more money goes directly to the nonprofits at a time that has never been more critical because of the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic,” said Alliance of Arizona Nonprofits CEO Kristen Merrifield. “Nonprofits have always had to cover the 2.1 percent fee charged by the payment processor. Thanks to the generosity of our donors, we’re able to waive that fee.”

“The beauty of Arizona Gives Day is that it shows what is possible when we all invest our time, talents and treasures to truly lift the tide of all nonprofits that participate,” said Merrifield.

It is going to take more than one day of giving for many Valley nonprofits to recover, but Arizona Gives Day is a positive way to start. Learn more at www.azgives.org. |CST

Scottsdale Arts Festival Celebrates 50 Years

Celebration of creativity returns March 13–15

Commissioned artwork by Stephen and Bonnie Harmston

Since its inception in 1969, the Scottsdale Arts Festival has taken place in several different locations throughout Scottsdale: Scottsdale City Hall, Scottsdale High School, the Executive House, to name a few. Each successive year the scope of the Festival increased and news about the quality of the event spread among regional artists. In 1973, the Scottsdale Fine Arts Commission initiated the idea of commissioning a special commemorative print honoring the event and an untitled work by artist James Rom was chosen. Some of these commissioned pieces will be on display during this year’s 50th anniversary celebration, March 13–15.

In 1989, the Scottsdale Cultural Council (now known as Scottsdale Arts) took over administrating and producing the Scottsdale Arts Festival. International, national and local art exhibitions and installations have always provided engaging enhancements to festival goers.

“The City of Scottsdale has built a reputation as a community that values and supports the arts, and I am very proud that this year marks the 50th anniversary of the Arts Festival! As one of our most popular and long-standing events, the Arts Festival showcases some of the most talented artist from across the nation. Our world class community appreciates arts and culture as evidenced by this event’s 50 years of success, and we look forward to further growth under the Scottsdale Arts leadership,” said Scottsdale Mayor W.J. “Jim” Lane.

The festival attracts nearly 20,000 loyal visitors annually, and this year’s guests will enjoy the best in visual, culinary, cultural and performing arts throughout the newly renovated 20-acre Scottsdale Civic Center Park. The festival also showcases more than 180 jury-selected artists from the United States and abroad. This year’s featured artists are local husband and wife printmakers Stephen and Bonnie Harmston of HarmstonArts (www.harmstonarts.com), who were commissioned to create an original artwork celebrating 50 years of the festival

In addition to art works ranging from painting, sculpture, glass, ceramics, jewelry, photography and other media, festivalgoers can enjoy live music and entertainment, and this year’s lineup has tunes for everyone performed by local and regional bands all weekend featuring music through the decades on two stages.

Attendees can also explore and cultivate creativity with hands-on activities and giant yard games, as well as visit Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art (offering free admission for the weekend). The popular Community Art Studio returns with fun for all ages, including community collage on the handcrafted Scottsdale Arts sign and experiences with the Boys and Girls Clubs of Greater Scottsdale and Scottsdale Artist School, as well as storytelling with the Scottsdale Public Library.

A lineup of local gourmet food trucks and eateries and a variety of fine wines, beers, cocktails and other beverages will be for sale. Additionally, patrons can bring their own reusable water bottles and use the City of Scottsdale’s water trailer for an easy refill to stay hydrated.

To purchase tickets or find complete event information, visit www.scottsdaleartsfestival.org or call 480.499.8587. 

 

New Hospital in Cave Creek Expected To Open Next Year

Artist’s conceptual rendering of Abrazo Cave Creek Hospital. Courtesy of Abrazo Health

Abrazo Health announced in early February that it is set to begin construction a new small-scale community hospital in Cave Creek near the intersection of Carefree Highway and Cave Creek Road. Expected to open in 2021, Abrazo Cave Creek Hospital is a new type of neighborhood hospital, sometimes referred to as a “microhospital,” designed with an emphasis on quality medical care, convenience, efficiency and short ER wait times.

Abrazo Cave Creek Hospital will focus on emergency and surgical services, with eight rooms for patients needing overnight care. The single-story, approximately 35,000-sq.-ft. facility at the southwest corner of Carefree Highway and 53rd Street will include a 13-bed emergency department, an operating room and eight inpatient rooms, along with additional services.

“I am thrilled to have Emergency Services available in the area,” said Cave Creek Mayor Ernie Bunch. “I believe this makes Cave Creek a more complete Community.”

Abrazo Health currently operates six Valley hospitals including the acclaimed Abrazo Arizona Heart Hospital. The Cave Creek hospital will be Abrazo’s third neighborhood hospital. Abrazo Mesa Hospital opened in October 2019 and Abrazo Surprise Hospital is expected to open later this year. Each is closely integrated with Abrazo’s larger sister hospitals, medical group and community physicians.

“We all prefer to receive care closer to home, and this type of hospital meets a need for access to medical care beyond what’s available at an urgent care or freestanding emergency center. The hospital will offer a 24/7 ER and have the ability to perform surgical procedures, with around-the-clock general surgery, hospitalist and emergency physician coverage,” said hospital CEO Ed Staren.

“Our goal is to provide multiple points of access for those who choose Abrazo for their care. Emergency care and operations like appendectomies and gall bladder procedures, for example, can be performed in the neighborhood hospital setting,” said Staren.

Patients with abdominal pain, sprains and broken bones, minor trauma, lacerations, dehydration, pneumonia and flu are typical of injuries and illnesses expected to be treated in the Abrazo Cave Creek Hospital emergency department.

“We’re anxious to begin providing care for our neighbors and friends in the Cave Creek area,” Staren said. “Providing quality medical care and excellent patient satisfaction are among our top priorities, and we want our ER waiting times to be among the shortest they can possibly be.”

When completed, the hospital is expected to create approximately 50 jobs. General contractor for the hospital is Adolfson & Peterson Construction; the facility was designed by E4H Architects.

For more information, visit www.abrazohealth.com.

 

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