Sixth Annual ‘It’s Art for Land’s Sake’ Seeks Entries — Deadline is Feb. 7

The 20129 first place winner, “Desert Jewels” by Peggy Orbon

Early inhabitants of Arizona were drawn to the awe-inspiring landscape that is the Sonoran Desert. Its unique flora and fauna continue to draw people from all over the world to it today. Desert Foothills Land Trust understands the importance of preserving this special place for the survival of the species that dwell here and for the enjoyment of generations to come. It’s a landscape worthy of not only protecting forever but immortalizing through art as well. It’s Art for Land’s Sake is a juried art exhibit and sale designed to promote conservation and wildlife protection through representational art.

The Land Trust is hosting the sixth annual exhibit and sale at the Desert Foothills Library March 6–19 with an opening reception Thursday, March 5, from 6–8 pm. The public is invited to attend the reception, and the exhibit will be open for the duration during regular library hours. The library is located in Cave Creek at 38443 North Schoolhouse Road.

Artists of all ages and levels of experience are encouraged to submit their work. There is an entry fee of $25 per piece and all works of art must be 2D and representational of a Desert Foothills Land Trust preserve. The entry deadline is Friday, February 7, 2020 at 4pm. Entry forms and a complete copy of the rules and guidelines can be found on the Land Trust website at www.dflt.org. Entrants may also call 480.488.6131 or email info@dflt.org for more information.

All proceeds will be for the benefit of Desert Foothills Land Trust and/or Desert Foothills Library.

Alice and David Are a Dynamic Duo Wishing for a Forever Family

— By Clint Williams
Aid to Adoption of Special Kids

Eight-year-old Alice is fearless as she moves smoothly up the rock climbing wall at Sky Zone in Scottsdale and confidently slaps the buzzer.

She then carefully works her way down the wall — and then starts back up. Practice makes perfect and Alice is nothing if not willing to practice.

Cheering her on is younger brother David, 7. And when it’s his turn to tackle the wall, Alice keeps a watchful eye as the protective — and a little bit bossy — big sister.

The siblings form a dynamic duo, says Brianna, a child specific adoption recruiter with Aid to Adoption of Special Kids (AASK).

“Alice is a girly girl,” Brianna says. “She likes all things glittery and sparkly.

“David enjoys playing outside. He is very tidy, and he likes to make his bed every single morning.”

Both are active and giggly. Both do well in school and love routine. Both love macaroni and cheese. The two have never lived without each other.

“They have a very strong relationship together and it’s important that they maintain that relationship throughout their lives,” Brianna says, adding that it is also import the two stay in Arizona.

The siblings would thrive in a forever home that has two parents with an abundance of energy.

“The perfect forever family for Alice and David is one that has the time, patience and understanding to work with them,” Brianna says.

Alice and David would do well in a family with other children, but, because of allergies, they can’t live in a home with cats or dogs.


For more information on children in foster care eligible for adoption, call Aid to Adoption of Special Kids at 602.930.4900, or visit www.aask-az.org.

Cave Creek Museum Offers Free ‘Designing in the Desert’ Workshop

Cave Creek Museum with the Stamp Mill in the background.It’s in our DNA to build. From Lego castles to backyard clubhouses or indoor forts of chairs and blankets, the urge to create a space for our physical or imaginative selves is wonderfully strong.

“About 10 years ago, I did an after-school program ‘What is architecture? What isn’t?’ with grade school students that ran for eight weeks,’” said Michael P. Johnson, architect and Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture at Taliesin West faculty. “These kids would jump out of their seats with excitement!”

Johnson will lead an architectural design workshop for kids and their parents Sunday, Jan. 12, from 2pm to 4pm, as part of the free monthly Cave Creek Museum Kiwanis Family Sundays series. The workshop begins with a PowerPoint presentation and a five-piece kit of construction parts, so that each child will be able to make a building of their own design to take home.

Michael P. Johnson

“How is light important to construction?” and “How is it art?” are questions that will engage all ages and generate enjoyable and multi-generational discussions. Building in our unique desert terrain is equal parts art and engineering, with a dash of poetry and history for good measure.

The architectural design workshop is part of the Cave Creek Museum’s 2019–20 Featured Exhibit The Legacy of Gerry Jones, which will be on display through the end of May 2020. Workshops and special events will be held at the Museum and other locations during January, February and March. The Gerry Jones Home Tour is Sunday, March 8. For information and Home Tour tickets, contact the Cave Creek Museum.

The Cave Creek Museum is located at 6140 Skyline Drive in Cave Creek, just south of Cave Creek Road as it winds through town. For a map and directions, visit cavecreekmuseum.org or call 480.488.2764. Cave Creek Museum hours on Sunday are 1–4:30pm. Parking is readily available. General admission: adults $7, seniors $5, students 12 and over $5. Children under 12 are free.

The year 2020 commemorates the 50th Anniversary of the Cave Creek Museum, repository of the Cave Creek and Carefree area’s history, culture and artifacts.

 

Cartel Coffee Lab Heads North with Two New Phoenix Locations

The longstanding Tempe-based coffee purveyor, Cartel Coffee Lab, known for sourcing and roasting some of the best coffee from around the world is launching new locations in Paradise Valley and Uptown Phoenix. Located at the northeast intersection of Tatum and Shea, the Paradise Valley location is scheduled for a grand opening Dec. 20 . (Open holiday hours 7am–3pm through Christmas Eve; 6am–8pm regular hours.) Visitors can look forward to free coffee all day and a chance for one winner to receive free coffee for a year. The 1,200 square foot Paradise Valley location features a state of the art La Marzocco Linea PB espresso machine, draft cold brew and Chemex pour overs of rotating single origin coffees.

As a part of its continuing partnership with boutique hospitality brand ARRIVE Hotels, Cartel will be opening inside ARRIVE’s upcoming hotel at Fourth Avenue and Camelback in Uptown Phoenix in 2020. This will be the third in a series of successful cafe/hotel partnerships after locations in Palm Springs and Austin.

“We’ve always been cautious when it comes to choosing locations or partners; both of these new cafes represent a lot of consideration and these are two communities we are excited to grow with,” said Jason Silberschlag, owner and co-founder of Cartel.

Husband and wife Jason and Amy Silberschlag began Cartel 12 years ago with a mobile cart, which will now have expanded into 10 retail locations across three states supported by their two Arizona roasteries in Tempe and Tucson. “From day one, it’s been about neighborhood cafe culture first and foremost,” said Amy. “We can’t wait to make new friends in North Phoenix!”

It isn’t just the Silberschlags who are excited.

“I’m personally thrilled that they’ll be just across the street from me,” says Woo Jonathon, general manager of neighboring restaurant The Covenant. “I’m always up for more local business in Paradise Valley.”

The name Cartel Coffee Lab was inspired by oil cartels; instead of stifling competition, Cartel has an ambitious goal to band together like-minded coffee producers and professionals to drive customer appreciation for hard work and quality. To date, Cartel partners with 110 rotating coffee farms spread across the globe who are guaranteed to be paid 30 percent to 150 percent above their costs, far above pricing set by Fair Trade.

Through the years, Cartel has received recognition from the likes of Alton Brown, Vogue and Food & Wine as a gold standard in specialty coffee craft and service. The secret is in their 90 percent retail focus, which has allowed them to prioritize the experience of the end user in all their decisions.

For additional information, visit www.cartelcoffeelab.com or find Cartel Coffee Lab on Instagram, Facebook and Twitter.


Photos courtesy of Cartel Coffee Lab

Sell One, Give One — Scottsdale Company Supports Area Animal Rescues

—By Jeff Rosenfield

Max and Neo, a for-profit online dog accessory store with a warehouse based in Scottsdale Airpark in North Scottsdale that donates weekly to 3,500 rescues around the United States, will be donating an extra “Christmas” box of pet supplies — each box worth about $275 — for the second year in a row.

Kenric Hwang stands next to three towers of Max and Neo Christmas donation boxes at the Max and Neo warehouse in the Scottsdale Airpark. Max and Neo will donate 3,500 boxes like these this December.

Since being founded by Kenric Hwang in September 2015, Max and Neo has made weekly donations to all the animal rescues on their list, over 100 of which are Arizona-based. For every one product they sell, they donate one item to an animal rescue.

Hwang said Max and Neo donates because he wanted to find a way to help rescues and customers both benefit from donations; the rescues receiving free items for their animals and customers buying an item and knowing another item will be donated too.

“At the end of the month we add up all the collars we sold and then we donate that many collars out and spread it amongst the rescues on our donation list,” Hwang said.

By the end of the year, Max and Neo will have donated over 180,000 pet products — worth nearly $3 million in retail — to rescues around Arizona and the United States in 2019, owner Hwang said.

On average, Max and Neo donates about 125 boxes of supplies — worth $47,000 in retail — per week to rescues, Hwang said.

Max and Neo keeps a list of 3,500 rescues it donates products to, which is available on the business website. They give to between 125 and 150 rescues each week, according to Hwang.

“We try and make it fair so that every rescue gets at least three boxes a year from us,” Hwang said.

These donated boxes — each worth between $350 and $400 — contain eight leashes and 12 collars of varying size, supplements, toys and other items, Hwang said.

Max and Neo asks each rescue to choose from 10 different boxes to best suit their needs.

“Some rescues only use harnesses; some rescues are really particular about their collars,” Hwang said.

For those rescues, Max and Neo will donate a box with only leashes upon request, Hwang said.

There are four boxes that contain all sizes of collars and leashes, for rescues working with more than one size dogs. Five boxes contain collars and leashes in the sizes: extra-small, small, medium, large or extra-large for rescues specializing in one size of dogs, Hwang said.

“A chihuahua rescue is not getting any collars larger than a small. They’re not getting dog toys that only a big dog can chew up.”

Hwang said he feels “fulfilled” for donating to rescues and that he is sure they are making an impact.

Liz Stegmeir, the founder of the AARF Animal Rescue and Sanctuary, based in Mayer, north of Phoenix, agreed.

“They’re helping a lot,” she said. “There’s $300 worth of items here. That helps us not having to go out and buy collars for the dogs.”

“That’s just in one box. They’ve sent us three different boxes. That’s almost $1,000 worth savings for us,” Stegmeir said.

A Christmas donation box, including a chew toy, a bag of holiday-themed leashes, a bottle of fish oil and more at the Max and Neo warehouse in Scottsdale Airpark.

Hwang said that the Christmas boxes are smaller than Max and Neo’s standard donation box, containing 18 holiday-themed items instead of 25 regular items because their donation list increased more than sales did.

“The collars are green and red and there’s a custom dog toy in there for Christmas,” Hwang said.

Hwang said the holiday-themed items were made by Max and Neo staff uniquely for the Christmas box.

“You couldn’t find the same leash or dog toy in our store,” Hwang said.  “They were only made for the donation boxes.”

Stegmeir said she was excited when she received an email from Max and Neo saying their Christmas box would arrive.

“We just got one less than a month ago, so I was shocked we’re getting another one so soon, and I think it’s great,” she said.

Karen Franklin is the founder of the Arizona animal rescue 2DaRescue, based in Gilbert.

Joining Max and Neo’s donation list a year ago, her group has received three small boxes with pet toys, leashes and collars, Franklin said.

“Their products are really good quality and we appreciate their help,” she said.

Last year was the first time Max and Neo tried donating to every rescue on their list during the holiday season. They only had about 2,000 rescues on their list and the boxes were brown instead of green with shapes such as bells, reindeer, snowflakes, presents and socks on the side.

“It gets harder as more and more rescues get on the list,” Hwang said.

“We just gotta get our sales to catch up to the number of rescues that are on the list.”


Jeff Rosenfield is a student at Arizona State University’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication.

Christmas in Carefree Ushers in Holiday Season

The Carefree Desert Gardens illuminated for visitors to the Christmas in Carefree celebrations. Photo: Herbert Hitchon

Christmas in Carefree returns to the Carefree Desert Gardens, with holiday-themed events and special celebrations designed to welcome the spirit of the season.

This year’s official Holiday Tree Lighting will take place Friday, Dec. 6, at 5pm in the Sanderson Lincoln Pavilion and at the iconic Carefree Sundial. The giant 25-foot Christmas tree and the Gardens will be illuminated for the first time during the holiday season with thousands of twinkling lights sparkling throughout the desert landscape. The ceremony will include a performance by various Cave Creek Unified School District student choirs, and Santa himself will handle the tree lighting duties. Following the tree lighting, a special screening of the popular holiday film Elf will be held in the Sanderson Lincoln Pavilion. Free hot chocolate and holiday treats will be available, along with snacks for purchase, and a holiday gift will be distributed to each child/family in attendance.

Santa makes another appearance in town Breakfast with Santa Saturday, Dec. 7, from 9am to 11am, in the Sanderson Lincoln Pavilion. Held in conjunction with Rural Metro Fire’s Holiday Toy Drive, attendees may bring a new toy, canned good or suggested donation of $5 per person for admission, with proceeds benefiting Foothills Food Bank. Enjoy free photos with Santa and a performance of Sing! Sleigh Bells Ring!, a holiday celebration in song featuring talented area youth.

The Sanderson Lincoln Pavilion will resonate with an evening of classic Christmas tunes, harmonies and holly-jolly jazz favorites when area favorites Vicki McDermitt and Chirp, featuring Jerry Donato, take the stage Saturday, Dec. 7, at 6pm. Presented in partnership with Spirit in the Desert and Music Serving the Word Ministries, the evening’s entertainment will be preceded with a performance of holiday favorites from the Cactus Shadows High School Jazz Band, directed by Kevin Brady. Music Serving the Word will be accepting non-perishable food donations, benefiting Foothills Food Bank. This concert is open to the public, and free to attend.

Rounding out the weekend, Pinnacle Creative Arts presents Hope for the Holidays — A WWII Christmas, Sunday, Dec. 8, at 2:30pm in the Sanderson Lincoln Pavilion. Step back in time to Christmas Eve 1944 and experience a serviceman’s holiday celebration. Tickets are $15, and available online at www.pinnaclecreativearts.com as well as at the door.

Congregants from Temple Chai, as well as members of the Jewish Social Group of Cave Creek and Carefree, will host the annual Chanukah in Carefree Menorah Lighting every evening at 5:30pm, beginning Sunday, Dec. 22, through Sunday, Dec. 29, in the Sanderson Lincoln Pavilion. Local groups and families will be invited to light the menorah each evening, with a special ceremony Sunday, Dec. 22, that will include the Temple Chai cantor and choir. Each evening’s service is open to attendees of all denominations and faiths.

For more information about these events, visit www.christmasincarefree.com or call 480.488.3686.

The Salvation Army Invites Community to its Annual Thanksgiving Dinner

The Salvation Army will serve a free traditional Thanksgiving meal with all the fixings at the Phoenix Convention Center’s South Building, on the southeast corner of Third Street and Washington Street, Thursday, Nov. 28.

Posted signage and volunteers will be on hand to direct guests to the event location and entrance.

The doors to the event will open at 9am and feature live music, free haircuts and nail service, hygiene kits, coloring for the kids, a big screen TV for watching the parade and football and counseling.

Meal service will be from 11:30am to 1pm.

“We are honored and blessed to provide this festive holiday event each year,” said Major David Yardley, The Salvation Army Metro Phoenix program director. “This is a free event that is open to the public, so we invite one and all to join us for food, fellowship and fun.”

Approximately 1,850 pounds of turkey, 125 gallons of gravy, 1,600 pounds of potatoes and 4,700 slices of pie will be prepared by Aventura Catering, with the help of hundreds of Salvation Army volunteers.

Around 1,000 people are expected to attend, and around 3,800 additional meals will be delivered to homebound individuals and Salvation Army Corps Community Centers across the Valley to serve their local communities.

“We give thanks to our valued community partners, volunteers, officers, staff and the City of Phoenix, whose generosity makes this event possible,” added Yardley. “It’s a testament to how our community comes together to help our neighbors in need.”

Discover Talented Artists During Hidden in the Hills

Arizona largest and longest-running artist studio tour, the Hidden in the Hills Studio Tour and Sale, returns for a 23rd consecutive year during the last two weekends of November (Nov. 22–24 and Nov. 29 – Dec.1). A signature event of the nonprofit Sonoran Arts League, the free, self-guided tour takes place from 10am to 5pm at 47 private studios throughout the scenic Desert Foothills communities of Carefree, Cave Creek and North Scottsdale.

Phoenix gourd artist Jan Downey and Gold Canyon mixed media/paper artist Karen O’Hanlon are two of 199 artists participating in the popular tour. While their art is very different, both are inspired by remote cultures and countries they have visited.

The first gourd Downey fell in love with was in Ethiopia. At the time, she was working as a cultural anthropologist with the National Museum of Ethiopia, helping them with their ethnographic collection.

“It was a gourd used by women in the very hot, remote desert to carry butter, and I was struck by how even a utilitarian object was designed and embellished,” Downey said.

A Chicago native who moved to Arizona from the Midwest, she was always fascinated by the multitude of ways humans have expressed their creativity.

“Humans have used gourds from prehistoric times as containers, dippers, bowls, spoons, tools and even musical instruments. Their many versatile shapes and sizes lend themselves to utilitarian service, but also makes them a great medium for artists,” she said.

After she retired, she devoted her time to creating unique gourd sculptures. She uses a variety of processes in her design work including pyrography, carving, painting with acrylics and ink dyes, and embellishing with natural materials.

Downey, who will exhibit her work at Judith Freeze’s Studio #46 in Cave Creek, has been working on a new series called, “The Village it Takes,” a play on the phrase, “It takes a village.”

O’Hanlon is the designer of Japanese paper miniature kimonos created in the same detailed fashion as full-sized traditional robes. Each is unique because the kimonos have the appearance of fabric, but they are actually paper. The high-quality papers are made by master craft artisans in Japan using traditional as well as modern tools and techniques.

As a regular visitor to Japan during her career as an international flight attendant, she became fascinated with Japanese paper art.

“I was fortunate to meet and study traditional Japanese paper arts under a master sensei, Yuriko Kodama,” O’Hanlon said.

It took O’Hanlon five years to master the art of the paper kimono. The exquisite and unique kimonos are constructed using kozo (mulberry paper) featuring popular designs from the Edo period (1600–1868).

“I use two types of kozo. One is chiyogami, which is decorated with brightly colored, woodblock-printed patterns. The other is yuzen, which includes patterns based on traditional silkscreen designs derived from the silks of the Japanese kimono,” she said.

During Hidden in the Hills, O’Hanlon will exhibit her work at Beth Zink’s Studio #27 in Cave Creek.

For complete details about the 2019 Hidden in the Hills Studio Tour and Sale, call 480.575.6624 or visit www.hiddeninthehills.org.

 

DAC Presents ‘Raptors in Your Backyard — Up Close’

Area residents have probably seen hawks circling overhead and heard the owls hooting in the evening and early morning, but they may not have a grasp of the true superpowers these birds exhibit.  At the next Desert Awareness Committee (DAC) seminar, guests will not only see them up close, but will be more aware of the struggles they face and how, as a local resident, to help.

Wild at Heart is a raptor conservation organization located in Cave Creek that rescues, rehabilitates and releases wild raptors. Join Jack Holloway Monday, Dec. 2, at the Holland Community Center, 34250 North 60th Street in Scottsdale, for this free seminar sponsored by the Desert Awareness Committee of the Foothills Community Foundation.  The seminar will be held 6:30-8pm. Registration is not necessary; a $5 donation is suggested for each seminar.

For additional information, visit www.azfcf.org/about-desert-awareness.


Photo by c.miles on Foter.com / CC BY-NC-SA

Inaugural Black Mountain Round-Up To Be Held Nov. 23 in Cave Creek

Valley residents are invited to dust off their boots and spurs and join 3,000 plus family and friends to see and support Cave Creek’s first Black Mountain Round-Up, scheduled for Nov. 23, at 7pm, at the Cave Creek Memorial Arena. Dan Baker’s Rodeo Productions and stock contractor Cody Reeser put together the toughest bulls and broncs in the Southwest for a Saturday night performance of the five fan favorite events in rodeo: bareback riding, ranch bronc riding, saddle bronc riding, barrel racing and bull riding.

According to organizers, this family event is dedicated to first responders, veterans, active and fallen heroes and Arizona’s Suicide Prevention Coalition. It will also be a “Tough Enough to Wear Pink Night” — in honor of cancer awareness. All the parking proceeds will be donated to a local charity. Attendees are invited to wear their pink and bring a spirit of passion for this Western way of life, while watching rodeo stars of today and tomorrow compete for Black Mountain Roundup titles.

Cave Creek Memorial Arena is located at 37201 North 28th Street, Cave Creek. Pre-event tickets are $15 — children 8 and under are free — or $20 at the door. For tickets, visit eventbrite.com and search “Black Mountain Roundup” or find the event on Facebook and Instagram for additional information.

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