About Arizona Wine: Laramita Cellars Has Big Plans

Darla-Hoffmann– By Darla S. Hoffmann, Certified Specialist of Wine

Laramita means ‘The Twig’ in Spanish; Laramita Cellars has big plans for many of them.

Have you ever concocted an extravagant brainchild while sitting at a bar sipping on a glass of wine? You weren’t sure you would make that dream a reality come morning, for maybe it was just the ambience or company at hand, but it was important enough to ponder on it for the night. Most of us wake up and say, “what was I thinking, that is going to take way too much time and money, not to mention it is an insanely risky undertaking.”

One night in 2006, Greg Gonnerman sat at AZ Wine Shop in Scottsdale. While sitting at the bar that evening, he designed the vision of making wine and owning his own vineyard. Unlike most people, he woke up in the morning and began mapping out his plan. I interviewed Greg at AZ Wine Shop as we felt it was the best place to feel the soul of his work. We sat and chatted at the very bar where he danced with his thoughts about winemaking. Greg poked his finger on the bar and said, “This is where it all started. I knew I needed a lot of education so I began doing tastings at AZ Wine Shop twice a week. My first attempt at winemaking was a gallon from Welch’s concentrate,” he laughed. “It really wasn’t that bad,” he said.

The genesis of his plantings began in the low desert at three micro-vineyards in San-Tan, Usery Pass, and Superstition in Mesa and Queen Creek in 2008. It was an experiment with assorted varieties in desert viticulture and it was called Goldmine Mountain Cellars.

“People told me I was crazy and that wine grapes would never thrive under 2500 feet. There were many challenges such as Sunburn, Dessication/Raisining, Uneven Ripening, Immature/Unripe Tannins, High Brix at Harvest, Low Acid at Harvest, Monsoon Rain and Mildew/Rot,” said Gonnerman. He didn’t want to completely abandon Goldmine Mountain Cellars but was confident in his winemaking skills, and knew he would make wines of higher quality at higher elevations. He began an extensive search for a spot to call home down high south where elevations are between 4,300 and 5,000 feet. We are at about 1,100 feet in Phoenix so his chances for success, although grape growing is never free of challenges, were going to increase dramatically.

Many conversations with nearby winemakers and soil samples later, he chose his location.

“The moment I pushed my boot into the dirt, I knew it was the right place for me and my grapes,” said Gonnerman.

It had electricity, a septic tank and a cargo container. He parked a camper trailer and went to work. And so was the birth of Chiricahua Ranch Vineyards, Arizona’s newest wine grape vineyard. The 40-acre vineyard site, with 10 planted to vines, is nestled in the foothills between the Chiricahua and Dos Cabezas mountains. He bought the property in 2012 and had his first ‘Chiricahua Vineyard’ crop in 2015, which is entirely sold out. Gonnerman sells his grapes to various other winemakers — Sand Reckoner and Kent Callaghan to name a few. He also sells his grapes to himself. You are probably thinking, “huh?” Gonnerman established his own winery, Laramita Cellars, located on the property because he wanted to distinguish his own label from the others who purchase from him. He wanted to establish his own premier and exclusive wines unique to him and his own winemaking style.

Laramita Cellars had its first vintage in 2016 and had its first release party at AZ Wine Shop April 27. Well that seems like the appropriate location to me, where the mind and the bar stool meets the boot and the dirt. The 2016 vintage is comprised of 31 cases of Rousanne, 31 cases of Dos Hermanas, a white blend of Rousanne, Marsanne and Viognier, 60 cases of a Mourvedre Rose, and 115 cases of Syrah, which should be released in July. It is going to be an intensely aged wine in neutral oak.

“I want to be known for making quality wine for early drinking,” said Gonnerman. So be on the look-out, these babies won’t last long. Gonnerman still holds his day job at General Dynamics as an Engineer Tech Writer. His musings for the future of his 40-acre vineyard are constantly at hand. The vineyard is currently flourishing with plantings of Italian, Spanish and French varietals. He particularly seemed quite proud of the way the Petit Manseng and Vermentio are expressing themselves.

The winery itself, Laramita Cellars, sits on the vineyard and is currently nothing but a bare slab steel structure with electricity to the building. In my opinion, if you know how to make great wine, the aesthetics of your surroundings are vastly insignificant.

He also has visions of a home-site vineyard in the future.

“I am thinking about a personal property with a home and about 5 acres planted to vine,” said Gonnerman.

Whether that means his 40-acre vineyard will become a retirement project or life-long journey is for him to know and for us to find out. As we wrapped up our conversation, Gonnerman said “You know, people enjoy talking about themselves, but I want you to know that I really enjoyed this interview.”

Awwww, I thought to myself. He then gave me a bottle of the 2016 Rousanne to take home and we parted ways. I enjoyed talking with you too, Greg. I took the bottle to imbibe with friends at a charity event this weekend. It was a delightfully rich combination of honey, tea, and nutty flavors; it also exemplified subtle tropical fruit and slight minerality. In my opinion, it had much in common with a classic California Chardonnay. While we are on the subject of my opinion, the next time you want to grab a bottle of Chardonnay from your local wine shop, why don’t you head over to AZ Wine in Scottsdale and pick up a bottle of Laramita’s 2016 Rousanne instead. You will have tried something new, supported a local winemaker, and intensified your own personal journey with the world of wine. There is so much to taste out there. Explore, and make America grape again.

 


East Valley resident Darla Hoffmann is a Certified Specialist of Wine and Sommelier. She is the owner of About Wine, a wine education company, where she does on-site tastings and classes at restaurants, home parties and corporate events. She also works part time in one of Arizona’s award-winning tasting rooms, LDV Wine Gallery in Scottsdale. A member of The Wine Century Club, she has tasted over 100 grape varietals. Her goal is to share her knowledge and passion for wine, while educating our readers on the booming wine industry in the state of Arizona. If you are a wine collector looking for tastings and storage in the Valley, email aboutwine@mail.com. Learn more at: www.aboutwineinaz.com.

Experience LDV Winery In Downtown Scottsdale – Discover wines that are true Chiricahua Mountain fruit

Darla-Hoffmann– By Darla S. Hoffmann, Certified Specialist of Wine

The art of making wine has much in common with having a baby. Both creations bring joy and happiness yet are fallible existences that will endure many trials and tribulations throughout its lifetime.

LDV Tasting Room in Old Town Scottsdale

I have the pleasure of doing weekly wine tastings in LDV Winery’s Scottsdale tasting room. Curt Dunham and Peggy Fiandaca, are the owners of the award winning LDV Wine Gallery and Lawrence Dunham Vineyards. Dunham often shares stories about their journey. When he speaks of this transition of life, the expression on his face is one of a proud parent. There were risks associated with starting and developing their vineyard. However, the second they laid eyes on the unique 40 acres of land in South Eastern Arizona, in the Chiricahua Mountain region, it became their baby. It had luscious volcanic soil, the water tested well for grapes and no agriculture had previously been grown on the land.

The land, very different from any other plot, was destined to share its character with the world. They agreed to adopt the 100 percent estate philosophy, which meant all grapes would be grown, produced and bottled on the property. Grapes exposed to UV, at this altitude and with this terrain, have the potential to be like the big fruit wonder grapes of the Rhone Valley in France.

“It would be an injustice not to grow what we knew would truly thrive here,” Dunham said.

Touring the vineyard with Curt Dunham and Peggy Fiandaca

They made the commitment to grow quality grapes and Dunham took on the winemaker job himself. No nannies in their house! The first crop came earlier than they had anticipated and by 2009 LDV produced 100 cases of wine. The 2015 harvest has nearly 3,000 cases. The 2016 is considerably lower due to a change in pruning practices to improve long term vine sustainability.

Their 2013 crop is just coming onto them market. This month, LDV released the 2013 ‘The Signature.’ This is the fourth consecutive vintage, the Road Block of the Petite Sirah produced high quality fruit worthy of showcasing on its own and receiving ‘The Signature’ designation. The wine shows amazing concentration of color and flavors. I asked Dunham what he expected to see from this vintage and how it might differ from the previous ones.

Touring the vineyard with Curt Dunham

“2013 was a challenging harvest as we experienced several rain events. Thanks to the diligence of our picking and crush pad crews, the 2013 wines turned out great considering weather conditions. Each year the wines will express the life of that vintage. If you like a particular vintage, get it, because next year will be different. That’s the philosophy of a true boutique winery,” he said.

They wanted to establish a wider, well-deserved presence for their talented scholar. So, they decided to bring pieces of their vineyard to the Valley. In 2014, the LDV Winery Tasting Room Gallery opened in Downtown Scottsdale, 6951 East 1st Street. They host a monthly supper club with a wine driven menu and wine appreciation events to showcase their wines and meet people in the community. They host holiday parties, family events and are working with nearby resorts for corporate workshops. The gallery and its charming patios give you a feeling of a home, yet exudes the presence of a vineyard with its trees, barrels and rocks from their soil. It’s where neighbors come to hang out, cook beautiful meals together and share the finest of wine. It is truly exquisite.

Their Sky Islander Wine Club is a great way to taste all of the wines and feel the Rhone style without leaving the country. They have several packages to include six bottles or 12 bottles per year coupled with tasting vouchers. Being a part of something like this is so special because you are sharing a dream. After all, it takes a village to raise a boutique winery!

The patio at LDV Tasting Room in Old Town Scottsdale

LDV winery has joined forces with the other four tasting rooms in downtown Scottsdale to create ‘The Scottsdale Wine Trail.’ You can now spend the day tasting wine in Downtown Scottsdale and experience five different wineries. They are all within walking distance. There are plenty of hotels nearby if a staycation is on your radar. If you prefer a day trip, Ubers and Limo services are available. Eric Emmert (www.azurbanwinetours.com) has a limo service in the East Valley and does day trips to Scottsdale and Sedona. Dunham and Fiandaca are also very interested in building relationships with local restaurants that are serious about good food and wine. “I always have food in mind while making my wines,” Dunham said. “I smell the grapes and think, what am I going to eat with this?”

Whatever each vintage brings, you can be sure Dunham and Fiandaca will make every effort to create a masterpiece. They are assiduous in treating their vineyard with ultimate respect and are proudly watching it evolve each year. Some vintages might yield grapes that release soft, subtle flavors, while others will be bold and outspoken. For LDV, youth is divine with a promising adulthood. I encourage you to experience the growth of these wines. In my opinion, they exhibit a lively spirit with a softhearted old soul.


East Valley resident Darla Hoffmann is a Certified Specialist of Wine and Sommelier. She is the owner of About Wine, a wine education company, where she does on-site tastings and classes at restaurants, home parties and corporate events. She also works part time in one of Arizona’s award-winning tasting rooms, LDV Wine Gallery in Scottsdale. A member of The Wine Century Club, she has tasted over 100 grape varietals. Her goal is to share her knowledge and passion for wine, while educating our readers on the booming wine industry in the state of Arizona. If you are a wine collector looking for tastings and storage in the Valley, email aboutwine@mail.com. Learn more at: www.aboutwineinaz.com.

About Arizona Wine: Central Wine On Central Avenue

Darla-Hoffmann– By Darla S. Hoffmann, Certified Specialist of Wine

It’s no secret that Downtown Phoenix has been kissed by welcomed urbanization and significant transformation. The use of Adaptive Reuse Projects is plentiful and it is becoming a big draw for people to move downtown. Businesses are also gaining exposure from people in the suburbs. This is such a positive message for the economy of Arizona. One of the many other things driving the economy is the increasing visibility of Arizona wines. My constant research of wine in Arizona led me to Central Wine, a product of an Adaptive Reuse Project, which just happens to be downtown, on Central Avenue, near Indian School. The building also houses The Clever Koi and Modern Citizen, a Leiden Mitchell salon.

Jenna Rousseau, owner of Central Wine

Jenna Rousseau, owner of Central Wine, was born in Arizona and is the fifth generation of the famed Rousseau Family. The Rousseau Farming Company has been putting healthy food on the tables of Arizonans since the 1800’s, so Jenna just might be someone we can count on to bring us quality products and great service for a very long time.

“I’ve always had a passion for wine and knew life would eventually bring me to wine in Arizona, but nine years ago, I didn’t feel our state was quite ready for my concept,” says Rousseau.

So, she moved to San Diego for college, studied abroad in Italy where she learned much about wine and drank a lot of it, then onward to Sonoma to work a Harvest at one of the vineyards, then took her talents to San Francisco where she worked in a wine distribution center and a local wine shop. Finally, she ended up working at The Ferry Building, San Francisco’s most famous landmark, working on the wine related topics on their website. The Ferry Building Marketplace is a vibrant gathering of local farmers, artisan producers and independently owned and operated food businesses. Rousseau is quite the little go getter and took full advantage learning the wine business at a very young age.

While keeping an eye on the wine industry in Arizona and watching the growth of Downtown Phoenix, she could see the time was right to roll out her vision back where she belonged. She moved back to Arizona and searched for a location where her concept would be accepted and embraced by the community. She wanted a retail shop combined with an experience. Central Wine is a wine bar with a huge emphasis on small brand wines for retail.

“You may find some of the wines that I carry in AJ’s, but never in a big box store,” says Rousseau. “I do carry a few Arizona wines and would love to carry more, but my focus is to stick with those that are not as readily available in the Valley. For example, I carry DA Ranch and Chateau Tumbleweed, so one doesn’t have to travel up north to taste their wines.”

Darla Hoffmann at Central Wine

The Arizona wine industry deserves kudos for supporting one another; be it a bar, restaurant, winery or vineyard, I see the comradery every time to do an article. For instance, while Rousseau and I were chatting it up, Kris Pothier, owner of Chateau Tumbleweed, personally delivered Central Wine’s order. Jenna often does wine tastings of Wagner Family Wines, including Caymus Vineyard. The Wagner Family of wine, of Napa Valley, has a family winemaking legacy that can be traced back over 150 years and eight generations. Wagner’s sister Rachel lives in Arizona and gladly facilitates tastings at Central Wine to showcase their wines to the people that live in her state. Central Wine also carries Chacewater Winery wines of the Sierra Foothills in California, owned by the Manuel family. Luke Manuel, son of owner Paul Manuel, lives in Arizona and delightfully delivers Rousseau’s orders himself. Yet another great demonstration of how the people living in our state thrive on helping each other succeed. I like hearing stories like that, so without much of an arm twist I bought Chacewater’s 2012 Malbec and 2014 Cabernet Franc.

Central Wine is celebrating three years in business and is enjoying sharing their hip style of wines by the glass and retail. The by-the-glass aspect allows her to keep prices lower in her retail area. If you buy a wine by the bottle and drink it inside, a $15 corking fee is included in the price, which is standard across the state. Even with those fees, the most expensive wine on the menu is $50, which you can take home for only $35. Jenna rotates her wines two times per month, some stay and some travel in and out just to keep things interesting.

The exquisite mix of Central Wine, The Clever Koi, Modern Citizen and nearby George & Dragon brings opportunity to the area. People have choices; they can have a glass of wine at Central Wine, and then mosey over to The Clever Koi for dinner or vice versa. Central Wine does offer small bites such as meat and cheese boards, burrata, and desserts. They also offer a variety of non-alcoholic drinks like coffee drinks, ice tea and lemonade.

To learn more about Central Wine and their fabulous wine club, my first suggestion is to call Uber and get yourself downtown, but if you aren’t able to do that just now check out their website at www.centralwinephx.com and put it on your list of places to visit.


East Valley resident Darla Hoffmann is a Certified Specialist of Wine and Sommelier. She is the owner of About Wine, a wine education company, where she does on-site tastings and classes at restaurants, home parties and corporate events. She also works part time in one of Arizona’s award-winning tasting rooms, LDV Wine Gallery in Scottsdale. A member of The Wine Century Club, she has tasted over 100 grape varietals. Her goal is to share her knowledge and passion for wine, while educating our readers on the booming wine industry in the state of Arizona. If you are a wine collector looking for tastings and storage in the Valley, email aboutwine@mail.com. Learn more at: www.aboutwineinaz.com.

About Arizona Wine: My Wine Cellar, Ahwatukee’s ‘Wine Hub’

Darla-Hoffmann– By Darla S. Hoffmann, Certified Specialist of Wine

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Owner Shannon Rush

I’ve been a wine lover for the better part of my life so when I moved to Phoenix from Cleveland 17 years ago, I was in search of that perfect wine bar, where I could peacefully explore exceptional and regional choices of beautiful wines. I bought my home in Ahwatukee but didn’t know the lay of the land, nor any people. Technology wasn’t as easy as it is now to find your local spot at the click of a button back then either. I became friends with a woman who told me on several occasions that she had either just gotten back from My Wine Cellar, or that she had a meeting next to My Wine Cellar. Finally, I asked “Where is your wine cellar?” Needless to say, I felt quite foolish to learn this was an actual wine lounge. However, I quickly learned that this ‘cellar,’ although didn’t specifically belong to my friend, did in a sense belong to the wine lovers in the community.

My Wine Cellar has been a staple on Warner Road in Ahwatukee for over a decade, but now under new ownership the subtle changes seem to enhance its already intimate vibe. Shannon Rush bought the restaurant in October of 2016. Rush moved from South East Asia to Philadelphia, PA at 17, where she submerged herself into the food and wine industry. Philadelphia is quite the foodie town and has received high marks from Travel & Leisure magazine regarding the new generation of young chefs. She knew this was a fabulous place to gain restaurant experience and high quality service skills.

She moved to Arizona six years ago, and began working at House of Tricks in Tempe which has been awarded more than 20 Best of Phoenix awards by the New Times, as well as the “Wine Spectator Award of Excellence. “

She soon became a regular at My Wine Cellar in Ahwatukee, fell in love with the place, and finally enjoyed working there for three years. She positioned herself in all the right spots which helped her discover what people want in a wine scene and dining experience. “I think it was always my plan to buy My Wine Cellar. It needed to stay with someone who already cared about it and wanted to take it to the next level. I feel like I am set up for success” said Rush.

My Wine Cellar has a loyal following who seem just as passionate about its future as the owner and staff. The local neighborhood restaurant is a place where people can feel comfortable coming alone, on a date, or with a group.

“I want people in Ahwatukee to know they will receive top quality service, food and wine in a homelike environment. We have plans of enhancing the patio with heaters and misters so that we can use it all year long. The golf course is an asset but it can be so much more” said Rush.

There are also some changes to the menu to include more wine centric options and small plates.

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Wine 101, featuring Sommelier Darla Hoffmann

“Our customers expressed extreme interest in bringing back our wine classes; we listened and they are back in full swing. Wine 101, featuring Sommelier Darla Hoffmann, quickly sold out for January [and February]. The next class will be ‘The Wines of Washington & Oregon,’ scheduled for Monday, March 13, at 6pm. We are already taking reservations for that class. We will be scheduling themed classes such as ‘Bordeaux Blends,’ ‘Wines from Down Under,’ ‘Italian Varietals,’ etc. as well as more Wine 101 and possibly 202 throughout the year” said Rush.

wcpic1111Rush welcomes your opinions in deciding which classes to hold at My Wine Cellar. You can sign up to receive emails on their website and Facebook page. The classes are designed to be non-intimidating and a fun way to explore your palate. Call 480.598.9463 now to reserve your spot as limited space is available.

“We always have something fun going on here. Besides our wonderful classes, we have weekly live music, monthly wine tastings, various wine festivals and winemaker dinners on our calendar throughout the year. We are open to any new suggestions as well,” said Rush.

Additionally, the Wine Club gives you a chance to try different wines at a discounted price. It is such a welcoming club; the members are down to earth wine lovers that share each other’s enthusiasm for learning and tasting wine. Being a part of the club gives you a sense belonging to your very own little ‘wine circle.’

I still chuckle to myself when I think that conversation with my friend many years ago, and my initial discovery of My Wine Cellar. It is extra special to me to have the opportunity to teach the wonders of wine at the very place that was such a wonder to me. If you are not already a regular at My Wine Cellar, I truly hope that you will stop in, and experience Ahwatukee’s wine hub for yourself.

My Wine Cellar is located at 5030 East Warner Road, and the hours of operation are 3-10pm Monday through Thursday, 3-11pm Fridays, and 12-11pm Saturdays. Wine 101 classes are $75 for all three classes held on consecutive Mondays. The cost of themed classes is $35 for one class also held on Mondays at 6pm. You can check out the website at http://www.mywinecellarphx.com to learn about the wine club and upcoming classes and events.


East Valley resident Darla Hoffmann is a Certified Specialist of Wine and Sommelier. She is the owner of About Wine, a wine education company, where she does on-site tastings and classes at restaurants, home parties and corporate events. She also works part time in one of Arizona’s award-winning tasting rooms, LDV Wine Gallery in Scottsdale. A member of The Wine Century Club, she has tasted over 100 grape varietals. Her goal is to share her knowledge and passion for wine, while educating our readers on the booming wine industry in the state of Arizona. If you are a wine collector looking for tastings and storage in the Valley, email aboutwine@mail.com. Learn more at www.aboutwineinaz.com.

About Arizona Wine: Vintage 95 In Downtown Chandler Celebrates Five Year Anniversary

Darla-Hoffmann– By Darla S. Hoffmann, Certified Specialist of Wine

As owner of About Wine and a wine columnist, I frequent a lot of wine bars.  I guess you could say I do this for love or money, but it’s mostly because wine gives me an eccentric supply of energy.  My latest vino victims were the folks at Vintage 95, a gorgeous wine lounge located in historic Downtown Chandler that just celebrated its fifth anniversary.vinpic2

The restaurant resides in the same building as the city’s first post office and 1926 landmark.  Vintage 95 and its upscale, yet comfy cozy personality, adds to the vitality of Downtown Chandler.  It is dressed up with chandeliers and large leather chairs, yet dressed down with a fireplace and casual patio seating for those who prefer informal dining.  The brick walls and old structures leave you with a feeling of wonder of times gone by.  Outside, modern day bustling streets and flourishing businesses wake up downtown Chandler with daily aspirations.  Vintage 95 is in the heart of it all and is most certainly contributing to its pulse.

General Manager, Grant Rembis has been with the restaurant since its conception, 5 years this past November.  He’s been a part of the inevitable changes every business must face from the day the doors open, to every day thereafter.  “We tribute a lot of our success to being mindful of consumer tastes and maintaining a solid and knowledgeable team.  Many staff members have been here since the beginning and we have progressed together.  The owners are from Chandler and want to give back to Chandler.  “We think you can feel that sense of place when you come here” said Rembis.  Owners, Craig and Tricia Hills encourage their staff to take their own initiatives, keeping Vintage 95 an avant-garde restaurant.

Grant Rembis, general manager, and Darla Hoffmann

Grant Rembis, general manager, and Darla Hoffmann

The wine list includes that of cult new world choices like Napa Valley’s Salvestrin and Columbia Valley’s Cayuse Cabernet Sauvignons, however you will find plenty of obscure wines as well.  I was happy to find one of my personal favorites, Runquist’s Petite Syrah on the menu.  Additionally, the old-world choices of Europe range from unique Spanish reds to zesty Austrian whites. Pick a country on the globe and it is likely you will find it within the comfort of these walls.  “We are constantly updating and adding wines from all over the world to our list.  This allows people to explore culture through their glass, at a better price point” said Rembis.

The immense national and international presence of wines does not mean Vintage 95 neglects the wines of our state.  You can find wonderful Arizona wines on the menu such as Sand Reckoner and Dos Cabezas.  “We have done local winemaker dinners and are always open to building those relationships and doing day or evening events” said Rembis.

Furthermore, and giving us even more opportunities to channel our inner oenophile, Vintage 95 uses a Coravin System for those wanting to try higher end wines without buying the entire bottle.  This is a device with a medical grade needle and capsule of Argon gas that allows one to pour a bottle of wine through the cork without spoiling the wine.  These wines are hand selected by the wine director for their level of quality and exceptional taste.

For some of us, wine falls second to nothing.  However, we are definitely living in a cocktail era and Vintage 95 has a program that is sure to life your spirits.  From fine Japanese Whisky, Mezcal, to Amari you are not going to long for a quality libation.   If beer is what you fancy, there is a hearty list with plenty of local choices to keep you hoppy.

Vintage 95 is located at 95 West Boston Street, Chandler.  It’s a rousing time to visit Downtown Chandler and take part in its blooming growth.  Check out their website www.vintage95.com, make dinner reservations or just pop in for a glass of wine.  The new year is a perfect time to share a beautiful vintage.

 


If you are a wine collector interested tastings and storage in the valley, or a wine establishment interested in having your wines reviewed or would like to host a wine class or tasting call Darla Hoffmann, CSW, at 480.540.7555 http://www.aboutwineinaz.com or email aboutwine@mail.com to schedule.

About Arizona Wine: Chateau Tumbleweed Wines Are On A Roll

Darla-Hoffmann– By Darla S. Hoffmann, Certified Specialist of Wine

The voyage of life can be much like that of a Tumbleweed.   We break away from our roots and go where the wind takes us.  We might get stuck when there are obstacles in our way, but when we come across wide-open spaces, we can’t be stopped.  This is the story of two determined husband and wife teams and their road trip to Chateau Tumbleweed.

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L-R: Joe Bechard-owner, Kris Pothier-owner, Corinne Westcott-employee, and Jeff Hendricks-owner of Chateau Tumbleweed

The four owners, Kris Pothier, Joe Bechard, Kim Koistinen and Jeff Hendricks met around 12 years ago working at Page Springs Cellars in Cornville, Arizona.  Kim and Jeff had been in the industry for some time but up until then Kris and Joe had only considered themselves cellar rats.  All four of them played different roles, honed their skills and gained an incredible amount of knowledge.

The four owners, Kris Pothier, Joe Bechard, Kim Koistinen and Jeff Hendricks met around 12 years ago working at Page Springs Cellars in Cornville, Arizona.  Kim and Jeff had been in the industry for some time but up until then Kris and Joe had only considered themselves cellar rats.  All four of them played different roles, honed their skills and gained an incredible amount of knowledge.  For a period of time thereafter, each of them explored various opportunities at different vineyards, wineries and careers in the arts in addition to Page Springs.

The talented foursome drew attention from prominent winemakers, and were quite possibly being recognized as the future of Arizona wines.  Youth combined with ambition make for a promising marriage in the wine industry.  Maynard Keenan, owner of Caduceus cellars and former rock star, saw great things in these wind travelers and approached them about making their own wine at his Four Eight Wineworks co-op.  This is a facility he created to allow winemakers with a high level of skill, but not a hefty bank account, to make wine.  It is a shared space with a press, destemmer, crush equipment, bottling line and fermentation tanks all funded by Keenan.  Keenan was faced with some legality issues at first because rotating use in one location was not specifically allowed under Arizona state law. Therefore, his guinea pigs had to make wine under Keenan’s Caduceus license. The laws were changed in 2014 and Four Eight Wineworks now runs as a true cooperative.   Chateau Tumbleweed made three vintages there never losing sight of their goal to open their own winery.   All four owners worked other jobs while breathing life into Tumbleweed at the co-op.  The Petznick family, owners of the historic D.A. Ranch in Cornville, took notice of their hard work as well and not only extended employment, but invested in their solo operation.

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L-R: Darla Hoffmann, Joe Bechard-owner, and Kris Pothier-owner

In 2015, Chateau Tumbleweed broke roots from Four Eight and took their own building on Highway 89A.  They’ve done two harvests on their own and are already seeing a need for expansion on their property.  When asked how they came up with the name for their winery, Pothier said “We had no intent to be in Arizona or in wine.  We kind of got stuck in the fence of the wine industry”. They are expressing their appreciation of freedom by experimenting with different winemaking styles, varietals, types of oak, and yeast.  They also use fun labels with ornate drawings incorporating the tumbleweed.  I had the pleasure of tasting their 2015 ‘Miss Sandy Jones’ Chardonnay & Verdelho blend, along with their fresh & spicy 2015 ‘Cimarron Vineyard’ Graciano made in whole cluster fermentation.  Additionally, Pothier and her benevolent character, sent me home with the 2015 ‘Will E. Cox’ red blend and the 2014 ‘Cimarron Vineyard’ Tempranillo.  There is an embodiment of cutting edge style to their wines as well as their individual personalities.  They are staying true to who they are as well.  “We take our winemaking very seriously, but not ourselves. We like to have fun and take out the ‘snobby’ of wine” said Bechard.

As they tumble into new ideas, they are spreading their seeds across Arizona, guaranteeing that there will be more tumbleweeds in the future. They don’t have their own vineyard yet but this is something they are hoping to roll into as well.  For now, they source from 10 different vineyards mostly in Willcox in Southeast Arizona.  So, as the song goes, “As tumbling tumbleweeds go, they have plans of drifting along with nowhere and everywhere to go, pledging their love to the ground, and leaving the cares of the past behind”.

Chateau Tumbleweed Winery and Tasting room is located at 1151 AZ-89A, Clarkdale, Arizona.  Visit their website at www.chateautumbleweed.com to learn more or purchase their wines online.


If you are a wine collector interested tastings and storage in the valley, or a wine establishment interested in having your wines reviewed or would like to host a wine class or tasting call Darla Hoffmann, CSW, at 480.540.7555 http://www.aboutwineinaz.com or email aboutwine@mail.com to schedule.

About Arizona Wine: Hidden Track Bottle Shop

Darla-Hoffmann– By Darla S. Hoffmann, Certified Specialist of Wine

 

azwines_hiddentrackIf I had to use only two words to describe what appeals to me in a restaurant, cabin, retail shop or even a concert hall, I would say small and intimate.  It’s always those off the beaten path spots that just have a way of stealing my heart.  Furthermore, I have pretty much made it my life’s work to support community and local businesses.  That, coupled with my passion for wine, was what made my visit to the Hidden Track Bottle Shop so special.  I walked in to the building located in Downtown Phoenix near Monroe and 1st Avenue and off to the right sat a tiny little shop with a whole lot of charm.  I felt like staying there all day, just looking at the bottles and talking with other people who love wine.

Owners, Craig & Danielle Dziadowicz have put their soul into the shop and you can feel it in the way they speak about the place.  They have been open for 16 months and have already developed quite a following.  They are residents of Downtown Phoenix and love living the urban life.  They weren’t sure if it was going to work because they had no baseline for their clientele.  What they did know was that they wanted a place like this to purchase wine, and if they wanted it maybe others did too.

“There’s a certain kind of spirit downtown now.  Phoenix is waking up and figuring out what it wants to be when it grows up.  There is so much activity going on all the time.  We are of the mind-set that this is your city, and if you want it you can have it,” said Danielle.

So, they made it their mission to put their vision into action.

azwines_hiddentrack2At a glance one wouldn’t have to ask why they named their shop Hidden Track, but like people there is so much more behind a name.  Some of us our named for our personality at birth, some after a parent or great grandmother, and some of us are named for what we are meant to express in this life.  Hidden Track has many meanings to the Dziadowicz family.  For instance, the building that houses their little shop was built in the 1960s, the same decade as the Beatles Hidden Track Album.  But even more than that, they feel that the wines they carry are the hidden gems of the wine world.

“We want people to try unfamiliar wines from boutique wineries that just do a really great job,” said Danielle.

“We will never upsell people, instead we try to encourage people to try wines at a lower price from a lesser known producer,” said Craig.

There are plenty of excellent high-end bottles of wine priced at $10 to $15 for daily drinking.  Join the wine club and get two wines per month for $25 plus discounts on other bottles.

Hidden Track may carry a few wines that you could find at a larger retail store, but their niche is the esoteric, farmer style, wines that represent a distinct terroir and are varietal correct for that region.

“We are proud to have wines from wineries that only make 230 cases in a single year.  That’s the stuff our customers get excited about,” said Craig.

The shop, set up in two sections separating old and new world wines, allows customers to browse on their own, or come in for tastings and mingle with neighborhood friends.

“I am a staunch believer that we have the best customers, and our distributors love meeting them.  We don’t have people coming in saying that they only drink ‘Chardonnay’ or ‘Cabernet Sauvignon’ from specific regions. Instead they are thirsty for knowledge and want to try something new,” said Danielle.

Many of the regulars met for the first time inside their shop and have become friends in the community.   They have wine tastings every Thursday 4:30pm-6:30pm and Saturday from 12pm-3pm.  Legality purposes do not allow them to sell by the glass but it is a great way to sample the wine and meet like-minded people.  Danielle and Craig have tasted everything in their shop and love building off of their adventurous customers.

Hidden Track carries many Arizona wines as well, and they love working with the local producers.  Their newest venture is co-making a wine with Southwest Wine Center’s Michael Pearce of Bodega Pearce Vineyards.

“We think he is one of the best producers in the state and we wanted his help infusing our style into a wine,” said Craig.

Beer is another customer-driven attraction that is getting lots of interest.  They break apart the beers so that people can buy different bottles without having to purchase a six pack.

“It’s kind of the Craft Beer way,” said Danielle.

Danielle and Craig enjoy working local events throughout Downtown Phoenix and are open to any and all ideas.  These are two people who love their community and are following a dream. If I had to use only two words to describe them I would say warm and welcoming.  Hidden treasures are not always in a chest, at the bottom of the ocean under lock and key.  If you are reading this, I just told you where to find these jewels.  X marks the spot at 111 West Monroe Street, Suite 120 (inside the lobby), Phoenix, AZ 85003.  As a fellow lover of wine I assure you, you are headed on the right track. Visit www.hiddentrackbottleshop.com.


If you are a wine collector interested tastings and storage in the valley, or a wine establishment interested in having your wines reviewed or would like to host a wine class or tasting call Darla Hoffmann, CSW, at 480.540.7555 http://www.aboutwineinaz.com or email aboutwine@mail.com to schedule.

About Arizona Wine: I’ll See You At Pillsbury Winery

Darla-Hoffmann– By Darla S. Hoffmann, Certified Specialist of Wine

The movies have a lot in common with a good bottle of wine. For starters they both require a producer that is powerful enough to create an outstanding finished product for our personal enjoyment. This extraordinary finesse is what ultimately allows us to disconnect from reality for a few hours and devour what’s in front of us. Sam Pillsbury, a New Zealand native and owner of Pillsbury Winery, is a film producer turned winemaker. As I take you through my visit at Pillsbury Winery you will see the similarities and operations of a brilliant mind.

This weekend, I made the trip to Willcox, Arizona, home to our state’s second AVA and possibly the newest in the country. The last stretch before reaching Pillsbury Winery is three miles of dirt road. Every passerby, and person caring for cattle or agriculture along that road waved to me, as if we all shared a common reason for being there.

pillsbury_dscn2624-2The first thing I will tell you about Sam is that he is an open book and his story is honest and true. He graciously gave me the tour of his property and shared the wondrous details of how it came to be what it is today. There was nothing growing on this land prior to his procurement. Sam started with the vision and drive to create something really tremendous on this land. He is a colorful personality and knew he needed to generate ideas and clever ways to meet his own expectations.

“People from New Zealand are very resourceful. We will figure out how to make great things happen with the slimmest of resources,” said Pillsbury.

His ability to find one-of-a-kind materials that stand up to some of the most premier equipment took me back to an episode of MacGyver and his trusty Swiss Army knife.

He didn’t start with the funds to build an elaborate high dollar facility but wasn’t going to compromise quality, so he had to figure out what sources and elements would give him his desired level of production. When asked how his filmmaking background relates to wine he said, “A lot of filmmakers make wine. We like what’s complicated and challenging and there’s an element of bravery and fearlessness to both.”

It became apparent that Sam is involved in every aspect of his own viniculture and viticulture practices. “I always set high goals and work toward them. I want to make the best wines in the country,” he added. A director will always be willing to do whatever it takes to rise to the top of the industry and produce a great final product.

He houses his barrels in renovated shipping containers that were once the property of Stout Cedar Mill and were being used to preserve apples. He upgraded the insulation, installed windows and put a cool box in each unit. Each one stores nearly 60 barrels and plenty of bottles. I believe they are now making apartments out of these containers in Downtown Phoenix. I’d be happy to bunker down in one of these.

Like making movies, growing grapes does not come without complications. The best at both have to be able to quickly address problems that arise during production. They must be able to identify problems and figure out the best way to fix them. That is precisely why Sam decided to keep the concrete drainage ditch, that surrounds his property, intact. When you are in the business of growing agriculture of any kind you have to be prepared for challenging weather conditions. Even in the desert, we are exposed to frost and hail. Heaters and fuel can be costly and a danger of environmental contamination. The drainage ditch sits just close/far away enough to serve as the vineyard’s fire pit, and I hear is quite the sight at night!pillsbury_dscn2596-2

It’s harvest time and the team at Pillsbury was busy bringing in bins of grapes, sorting, destemming, crushing and pressing. I watched as head winemaker James Callahan, also owner of Rune Wines, and crew were making magic on the crush pad. The days are long, the work is hard, and every second is critical at this point of the process. Yet, it seemed as though they were having a great time bringing the next vintage to life. Sam clearly has a lot of respect for his team and is open minded to their opinions of the wines. He readily let us taste from the barrels to test the soon-to-be, and not-so-soon-to-be, released vintages.

In the movies, there are always those unknown actors who show up in films and we think wow, who’s that guy? Sam introduced me to an obscure grape called Symphony, which is harmonizing beautifully with the desert heat and sandy soils. He also grows a lot of the beautiful, more familiar French and Italian varietals, like those Oscar winning actors we’ve seen in a 100 movies and hope to see in 100 more. Speaking of the Oscars, Pillsbury Winery is no stranger to winning. He has won gold medals and has some of the highest scores for any Arizona wines. He was currently named Best Local Winemaker by Phoenix Magazine, voted Best Arizona Winery by Arizona Foothills Magazine, and named “One of the rising stars of the Southwest” by Wine Spectator magazine. This year in 2016, San Francisco Chronicle Wine Competition awarded a Double Gold for Pillsbury’s 2013 Shiraz ‘Guns and Kisses,’ along with a swag of silvers and bronzes.

Pillsbury is a Harvest Host so people can camp on the vineyard site in Willcox and purchase these delectable wines in the tasting room by appointment. He generously tells visitors to grab some fresh fruits and vegetables straight from his garden before they leave. Pillsbury came to life in 2006 and its wines are available in many restaurants and stores in the Valley. He does winemaker dinners and is open to private parties and events.

Some stories have no ending and this one leaves room for many sequels. There are visions of casitas for lodging, and a restaurant that will serve nothing but fresh food from the property. Not to mention we have those exciting new blends waiting for us in barrels. For now, I welcome the academy to check out the website www.pillsburywine.com and visit the tasting rooms in Cottonwood or Willcox, but be sure to stay tuned, this one’s a cliff hanger.

 


Darla Hoffmann is a Certified Specialist of Wine, and Hospitality Beverage Specialist. She is the owner of About Wine, a wine education company, where she does on site tastings and classes at restaurants, home parties and corporate events. She also works part time in one of Arizona’s award winning tasting rooms, LDV Wine Gallery in Scottsdale. A member of The Wine Century Club, she has tasted over 100 grape varietals. Her goal is to share her knowledge and passion for wine, while educating our readers on the booming wine industry in the state of Arizona. Learn more at www.aboutwineinaz.com.

About Arizona Wine: Pomelo

Darla-Hoffmann– By Darla S. Hoffmann, Certified Specialist of Wine

Pomelo, a three month old, locally owned restaurant that serves classic American food, is my featured establishment of the month for wine and spirits in Arizona. I chose this ‘twist’ to my traditional winery theme, for several reasons. One, to let people in the Valley know they serve local spirits, locally grown fruits and vegetables and locally fed, processed and aged meats. Secondly, I have hopes of introducing Pomelo to Arizona wineries and wine enthusiasts across the Valley

Pomelo orders much of their spirits from Thumb Butte Distillery in Prescott. There is such a positive connection amongst business owners in our state. The owners of the distillery personally deliver their product to the restaurant. Pomelo is fast becoming famous for their specialty cocktails. The staff works together to design fun and unique drinks made with handmade mixers. The Bellissimo, made with Pomelo Vodka, Blackberry Thyme Syrup, Fresh Grapefruit juice and sparkling wine is a house favorite.

pomelo_dscn2543

Darla Hoffmann and Pomelo General Manager Chad Elling

When asked what makes their cocktails so special, general manager, Chad Elling said, “We design our own recipes. Mules are all the rage, but you will not find another Mule like our Pomelo Spicy Mule with Hatch green chile vodka, fresh lime juice and ginger beer. However, my personal favorite cocktail is our Summer Breeze, I named this one myself, it’s got Plantation five-year Rum, Ancho Reyes, Fresh lime juice and mango real.”

He also boasted their homemade sweet and sour recipe creates the best Margarita’s in town.

They are very proud of their value driven wine list as well. They strive to have the best prices in town without comprising quality. The current menu works beautifully with most of their signature dishes. I asked Chad about some of the popular dinner items and he said, “The Orchard Pork Chops are fabulous. They are Cider brined, pan roasted and served with seasonal vegetables and a Dijon mustard cream sauce over roasted garlic mashed potatoes.”

The wine lover in me immediately imagines what I will pair with this dish. Pomelo offers several medium bodied, fruit driven, affordable Pinot Noirs that will complement the flavors and create a satisfying balance. Another favorite on the menu is the BBQ Ribs, an Arizona red oak glazed, slow smoked half rack topped with Pomelo BBQ sauce, and served with house-made coleslaw and hand-cut fries. There are a number of Cabernet Sauvignons and Red Blends on the wine list that will round off the rich mouthfeel of these savory, hearty ribs.

Another huge favorite is the Napolitian style pizzas made in their pizza oven imported directly from Italy. All day Monday and Tuesday they offer pizza & a bottle of wine for $20.00! Pomelo has several Italian wines on the menu that are best suited for pizza night. High acidity and subtle red fruit harmonize wonderfully with red sauce and spicy toppings.

pomelo_dscn2510Chad gave me an educational tour of what was once the site of one of Arizona’s first citrus farms. The pomelo and cocktail citrus trees that still grow on the property inspired the name and many of the menu items. The Pomelo fruit aspires to be the next freshly squeezed juice in some of the signature cocktails. Pomelo was conceived by Ken and Lucia Schnitzer and Jerry Mansoor, the team behind Luci’s Healthy Marketplace, and it reflects their deeply-held values of family and community. Located in the heart of Phoenix’s North Central neighborhood, Pomelo hires local suppliers, uses homegrown ingredients, and is proud to be part of a warm, friendly and close-knit community. The entire property is owned by the same 3 people and is everything but ordinary.

The building that houses Pomelo is a 1920’s Adobe style home with the original fireplace and coffee cups of Schnitzer’s great grandmother hanging on the walls. The private dining room called the green room was made from one piece of wood from a Eucalyptus tree that once grew on the property. The atmosphere and ambiance was ignited by keeping some of the old and welcoming some of the new structures. For example, the dark wood in the bar is a part of the old structure while the light wood in the dining room is a part of the new adaptive re-use project.pomelo_dscn2506

Luci’s at the Orchard is on the same property yet has its own unique food choices and cocktail menu. Luci’s general manager, Michelle Van Horn told me the curbside service is overwhelmingly popular. Customers are loving the convenience of getting quality food fast.

As we strolled about the restaurant duo Chad showed me the shared courtyard and patio, with its own barn and bar that sits between Luci’s and Pomelo’s. Throughout my tour, kids were enjoying the outdoor splash pad while Moms and Dads were comfortably enjoying lunch and conversation. The water lines from the splash pad also waters the agriculture on the property. I watched as Phoenicians rode in on their bikes, ready to enjoy a bite before tackling the day. There are yoga classes and music on the lawn on specified days, and a host of events planned for the year. The ‘shared table’ night is a great way for people in the community come together, sit at one long table on the patio and get to know each other while supporting the local life.

“We have so many organized events planned throughout the year yet are thrilled to help people with their private parties as well,” events coordinator Linda Schnitzer said.

I asked Chad what kind of reputation he wants for Pomelo. He said, “When it comes to events we are the professionals. We will host an event for two to 350 people. We go above and beyond and strive to give exceptional service to everyone. We can handle anything. The patio is perfect for entertaining and we can cater from the restaurant. The misters create a foggy chic atmosphere at night and there is a magnificent view of Piestewa Peak. There are hopes of a farmer’s market in the courtyard and we are open to Arizona winemaker dinners on the patio.”

As a Certified Specialist of Wine and Arizona wine enthusiast I would love to see this come to fruition. After all, great food and wine have been bringing people together for centuries. Throw creative cocktails in the mix and there is something for everybody. So hop on your bike and head over to Pomelo; it’s time to imbibe. I’ll have one with a ‘twist!’

Pomelo is located at 7100 North 12th Street, Building 1, Phoenix. For more information, visit www.pomelophx.com.


If you are interested in having your wines reviewed or would like to host a wine class or tasting call Darla Hoffmann, CSW, at 480.540.7555 http://www.aboutwineinaz.com or email aboutwine@mail.com to schedule.

About Arizona Wine: Prescott Winery

Darla-Hoffmann– By Darla S. Hoffmann, Certified Specialist of Wine

Prescott Winery_Darla Hoffmann and owner Lisa Russell

Prescott Winery owner Lisa Russell (L) with Darla Hoffmann

Exploring the Arizona wine scene is a fascinating phenomenon. There are the pioneers whose vision developed the framework of our vineyards, and the budding neophytes offering fresh ideas and innovative concepts. Each bring their own twist to Arizona’s wines. Their common ground is the never ending learning curve. Prescott Winery, one of Arizona’s newest wineries, is all about continuous education and fostering goals. I met with Lisa Russell, one of the owners of Prescott Winery who shared their courageous story with me. She so humbly wanted me to know that she and her dad are the minority owners, while Bill Smoot is the majority owner. The very elegant Russell gave kudos to many people in the Arizona wine industry for the success of the up and coming Prescott Winery. She has her own hopes and dreams for the winery but is soaking up advice from everyone who is willing to share. In Arizona, that’s most people in the industry. I spent the afternoon with Russell, and her Tasting Manager, Barbara Rowland, who are both refreshingly real, and down to earth wine lovers.

When asked about their style of winemaking and wine growing region, Russell said, “We are growing grapes in Coyote Springs of Prescott Valley. However, it will be about three years before we have our own fruit for wine. We currently source grapes from Rolling View Vineyards in the Kansas Settlement of the Wilcox Bench in Southeastern Arizona. We have custom crush arrangements with several winemakers, Tim White, original winemaker of Arizona Stronghold, and Michael Pierce, of Rolling View Vineyards and Director at the Southwest Wine Center.”

PrescottWinery-RAt Prescott Winery, they strive to develop their own brand. Owner, Bill Smooth likes the idea of “Fun Wines” and “Fine Wines.” Both have very different styles, labeling and marketing. The image of the winery is a combination of many things that were relevant to the building and the town at one point in time. The house has been a pottery shop, tattoo parlor, tea room and a residence. They didn’t want to take any history away from the house, yet they wanted to infuse their own style.

When asked about the desired look and feel, Russell said, “We like the clean aesthetic look and contemporary pieces for our brand but we have to respect the culture and ancestry. We like to connect with Prescott and local legends in our décor and labeling. Hence, our 2014 Big Nose Kate Red Blend! Big Nose Kate was Doc Holliday’s common law wife and she lived and died in Prescott, Arizona. We also like to include parts of Prescott on our labels. A photo of Watson Lake is the featured artwork on our 2015 Heritage Chardonnay bottle.”

I can’t wait to see what will be on the bottle of their red blend called “Jewel” to be released this month.

The baby new winery, as Russell calls it, works with other wineries to keep a plenteous list in the tasting room. “As small batch producers we are happy to have select wines from Burning Tree Cellars on our menu. It exuberates their presence in the Prescott region while helping us maintain a variety for our customers.”

Russell is an experimental winemaker and student at Yavapai Southwest Wine Center. She loves to get her hands dirty. She and her dad Facetime while engaging in new concoctions that just could be the future of Prescott Winery.

“We are working on our first small batch of Petit Sirah. This will not be available for commercial sale but it is allowing us to shape our own style. Winemakers, White and Pierce are such valuable resources and their creativity and skill is helping us reach our goals.”

I asked Russell about hosting events and working with the local community. She said, “We love working with local restaurants for our events. We want to support each other. We may be doing some partnering with pop-up restaurants where they bring in the food and we pair our wines with their menu.”

There is a huge local business model in Prescott and with Prescott Winery. They are Local First members and support local artists. The owner of the building and local potter, Carol Commins, still occupies some of the establishment and they work together on events.

Finally, I got the opportunity to taste the wines on their peace-loving patio. The old world style of grape growing, combined with the eclectic character of the winemakers, give their wines a personal edge. Russell told me she asked majority owner and nearly retired Smoot, why he would fund this project/business at this point in his life. He said he wants to be able to look outside of his home and see a vineyard living on his property. It will be so exciting to watch this inspirited project grow, and sparkle like the “Jewel” it is meant to be.

Well, Prescott might be famous for Whiskey Row and its shot and beer establishments, but it is now a playground for foodies and wine lovers as well. Add Prescott to your list of wine travels and be sure to pop in Prescott Winery at 216 North Alarcon Street. You will be greeted by warm, fun-loving souls eager to share their lively wines! Prescott Winery is walking distance to Whiskey Row, plenty of hotels, and fine dining. For more information, visit www.prescottwinery.com.


Darla Hoffmann is a Certified Specialist of Wine, and Hospitality Beverage Specialist. She is the owner of About Wine, a wine education company, where she does on site tastings and classes at restaurants, home parties and corporate events. She also works part time in one of Arizona’s award winning tasting rooms, LDV Wine Gallery in Scottsdale. A member of The Wine Century Club, she has tasted over 100 grape varietals. Her goal is to share her knowledge and passion for wine, while educating our readers on the booming wine industry in the state of Arizona. Learn more at www.aboutwineinaz.com.

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