Taliesin West Inscribed on UNESCO World Heritage List


Joins seven other Wright sites

With 11 of his buildings in the Greater Phoenix area alone, most Valley residents are familiar with the work of Frank Lloyd Wright. Wright’s visionary work cemented his place as the American Institute of Architects’ “greatest American architect of all time.” And in July, the World Heritage Committee, meeting in Baku, Azerbaijan, officially inscribed The 20th-Century Architecture of Frank Lloyd Wright, which includes eight major works spanning 50 years of Wright’s career, on the UNESCO World Heritage List (whc.unesco.org).
The sites include Unity Temple (Oak Park, Illinois), the Frederick C. Robie House (Chicago, Illinois), Taliesin (Spring Green, Wisconsin), Hollyhock House (Los Angeles, California), Fallingwater (Mill Run, Pennsylvania), the Herbert and Katherine Jacobs House (Madison, Wisconsin), Taliesin West (Scottsdale) and the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum (New York, New York).
There are more than 1,000 World Heritage sites around the world, and the group of Wright sites is now among only 24 sites in the U.S. The collection represents the first modern architecture designation in the country on the prestigious list.
“This recognition by UNESCO is a significant way for us to reconfirm how important Frank Lloyd Wright was to the development of modern architecture around the world,” says Barbara Gordon, executive director of the Frank Lloyd Wright Building Conservancy. “There are nearly 400 remaining structures designed by Wright. Our hope is that the inscription of these eight major works also brings awareness to the importance of preserving all of his buildings as a vital part of our artistic, cultural and architectural heritage. All communities where a Wright building stands should appreciate what they have and share in the responsibility to protect their local — and world — heritage.”
Here in Arizona, Taliesin West, also a National Historic Landmark, is nestled in the desert foothills of the McDowell Mountains. It serves as the home of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation and the School of Architecture at Taliesin. Wright’s beloved winter home, and the bustling headquarters of the Taliesin Fellowship, was established in 1937 and handcrafted over many years. Deeply connected to the desert from which it was forged, Taliesin West was built and maintained almost entirely by Wright and his apprentices, making it among the most personal of the architect’s creations.

“These sites are not simply World Heritage monuments because they are beautiful,” said Stuart Graff, president and CEO of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation. “It’s so much more than that. These are places of profound influence, inspiration and connection.”

To learn more about the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation or to tour Taliesin West, visit www.franklloydwright.org.

 

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