Slow Down & Enjoy the Ride — Grand Canyon Railway’s ‘Iron Horse’ Gallops On


The steam engine changed everything. It created time zones, kick-started the Industrial Revolution and 150 years ago the Transcontinental Railroad was created, connecting the East and West coasts and reducing travel from around five months to about five days. It opened up the possibilities of exploring destinations all across America, including the South Rim of the Grand Canyon in 1901. Today, finding a living, working steam engine pulling a real train that’s going somewhere in the U.S. is rather rare. Of the 30,000 built, less than 200 survived, and only a few are still running today.
One place where romantics, rail enthusiasts and younger generations can learn, hear, see, smell and feel the majesty of the Iron Horse is on Arizona’s Grand Canyon Railway.
Grand Canyon Railway is once again bringing out its operational Steam Locomotive monthly on the first Saturday, through Oct. 5. They will also run a special steam train Sept. 21 to celebrate the Railway’s 30th anniversary.
While the Grand Canyon Railway has two operating steam engines, this year the honors will go to #4960, built in 1923 and weighing in at 310 tons. For more details, including departure times and ticketing information, visit www.thetrain.com/events/steam-saturdays.
For information about the Grand Canyon Railway and special overnight packages at the Grand Canyon Railway Hotel in Williams, AZ, visit www.thetrain.com or call 800.843.8724.


Photos courtesy of Grand Canyon Railway & Hotel
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